Nickname:
Named after the Philadelphia Warriors, a ABL team owned by General Manager Eddie Gottlieb.
 
Coach:
Steve Kerr 2014/15-

Arena
:
Oracle Arena 1997/98-
 
Historical Moments:

1962/63:
Playing their home games at the Cow Palace, the San Francisco Warriors were coached by Bob Feerick. Once again Wilt Chamberlain was a monster inside, averaging 44.8 points and 24.3 rebounds per game, league in both categories for a fourth straight season. However, the team couldn't break the .500 mark and failed to reach the playoffs in the Western Division by finishing in fourth place with a 31-49 record.

1963/64
:
Their second season in San Francisco brought better results as a team coached by Alex Hannum and led by Wilt Chamberlain, Tom Meschery, Wayne Hightower, Guy Rodgers, Al Attles, Gary Phillips, and Nate Thurmond-rose to the top of the Western Division with a 48-32 record. Chamberlain led the league in scoring for the fifth straight season with 36.9ppg, and Thurmond was named to the NBA All-Rookie Team. In the Western Division Finals the Warriors edged the St. Louis Hawks in a hard fought seven game series to earn a trip to the NBA Finals. However, in the finals the Warriors were no match for the Boston Celtics who won their unprecedented 6th straight Championship by beating the Warriors in five games.

1964/65:
After getting off to a rough start the Warriors decide to make a change by shipping Wilt Chamberlain home to Philadelphia in January 15th trade with the 76ers. Life without Wilt was hard the rest of the way as the Warriors plummeted into last place finishing with a woeful league worse 17-63 record. 

1965/66
:
The Warriors showed dramatic improvement with the addition of Rookie of the Year Rick Berry. The Warriors would battle for the playoffs all season falling one game short while doubling their previous season win total at 35-45.

1966/67:
The Warriors continued to rise winning the Western Division with a solid 44-37 record. In the playoffs the Warriors would beat the Los Angeles Lakers in three straight games, to advance to the Western Finals. In the Western Finals the Warriors would upend the St. Louis Hawks in six games to return to the NBA Finals. In the NBA Finals the Warriors met up an old teammate, Wilt Chamberlain who led the Philadelphia 76ers to a then best all time 68-13 record. The Warriors would prove a worthy adversary losing Game 1 in an overtime shootout. However, in the end Wilt was too much to overcome as the 76ers won the series in six games.

1967/68
:
The Warriors were dealt a blow before the season even started as star Forward Rick Barry signed with a team in the rival ABA. Without Barry Nate Thurmond would have one of his finest season picking up the slack, as the Warriors finished in third place with a 43-39 record. In the playoffs the Warriors would get back to the Western Finals by knocking off the lame duck St. Louis Hawks in 6 games. However the Warriors would be swept in four straight games by the Los Angeles Lakers.

1968/69: With Nate Thurmond pulling down 19.7 rebounds per game the Warriors are able to get back in the playoffs despite finishing with a mediocre 41-41 record. In the playoffs the Warriors would be knocked out right away falling to the Los Angeles Lakers in 6 games.

1969/70
:
With Nate Thurmond missing 21 games due to injury the Warriors fail to make the playoffs finishing in 6th place with a 30-52 record.

1970/71: With realignment the Warriors bounce back finishing second place in the Pacific Davison to qualify for the playoffs with a 41-41 record. However, in the playoffs the Warriors are no match for the Milwaukee Bucks led by Lew Alcindor who take the Warriors out in five games.

1971/72
:
After struggling in San Francisco the Warriors jump across the Bay to Oakland changing their name to the Golden State Warriors to draw a broader fan base. With the addition of Cazzie Russell who along with Jeff Mullins, and Nate Thurmond average 21.4 ppg the Warriors finish in second place with a 51-31 record. However, in the playoffs the Warriors would lose to the Milwaukee Bucks in five games for the second straight year. 

1972/73
:
After tearing through the ABA for four years to the tune of 30.5 points per game, Rick Barry was forced by a court decision to return to the Warriors for the 1972-73 season. His homecoming suddenly gave the team a formidable team. Although the Warriors won fewer games at 47-35 they made tae playoff again by finishing in second place. However, in the playoffs the Warriors would final get past the Milwaukee Bucks winning their Western Semifinals series in 6 games. In the Western Conference Finals the Warriors run would come to an end as they fell to Wilt Chamberlain and the Los Angels Lakers in five games. 

1973/74:
Despite a solid 44-38 record which had them in contention for a Division Title all season the Warriors fail to make the playoffs.

1974/75:
After four seasons of second-place finishes, changes were needed. Nate Thurmond was traded to Chicago for Clifford Ray, a young defensive center, and Golden State drafted Keith Wilkes , a graceful 6-61/2 forward whose game was as smooth as his nickname "Silk". Cazzie Russell had played out his option and joined the Lakers, leaving Rick Barry as the team's undisputed leader. Coach Al Attles used this to his advantage, installing a team-oriented system that drew on the contributions of as many as ten players during a game, while emphasizing pressure defense, hustle, and passing. With Barry playing the staring role scoring 30.6 ppg the Warriors captured the Pacific Division title with a 48-34 record. In the playoffs the Warriors would get to the Western Conference Finals by beating the Seattle Supersonics in six games. In the Western Finals the Warriors looked like they were about to be done in by a former teammate again trailing Nate Thurmond and the Chicago Bulls three games to two. However the Warriors rallied to win Game in Chicago and too k the series with a hard fought 83-79 Game 7 win in Oakland. In the NBA Finals the Warriors were in tight battles all series facing the Washington Bullets. However, they would win each game taking the series in four straight games, including one point wins in Game 2 and Game 4. Rick Barry would be named the series MVP. 

1975/76: Coming off their NBA Championship the Warriors were even better finishing with a franchise best 59-23 record. In the playoffs the Warriors would get back to the Western Conference Finals by beating the Detroit Pistons in six games. In the Western Finals the Warriors faced the Phoenix Suns leading the series two games to one. With Game 4 in overtime the Warriors were moments away from a 3-1 series lead. However, the Suns would rally to win the game 133-129. The Warriors would bounce back to take Game 5, but the Suns would not go away winning Game 6 and Game 7 to stun the defending Champions.

1976/77
:
With many of their stars aging the Warriors began to show signs of fading as they struggled to finish n third place with a 46-36 record. In the first round the Warriors would have one last hurrah beating the Detroit Pistons in hard fought three game series. However, in the Western Semis the Warriors would be eliminated by the Los Angeles Lakers in seven games.

1977/78:
The Warriors began to fall apart as they lost Jamal Wilkes, and Gus Williams to Free Agency. Despite finishing with a winning record for seventh straight season at 43-39 the Warriors would finish in last place in a tough Pacific Division missing the playoffs by one game. Following the season the Warriors continued to fall apart as Rick Barry signed with the Houston Rockets.

1978/79
:
Without a true scoring star the Warriors struggled all season finishing in last place with a 38-44 record.

1979/80:
The Warriors continued to plummet finishing in last place for a third straight season with a terrible 24-58 record. Making matters worse was the Warriors knack for bad luck, first Phil Smith's season was ended by an Achilles injury then Coach Al Attles missed the final 21 games with same malady. In addition the Warriors finished with an all-time worst 0-8 record in overtime.

1980/81
:
The Warriors unveiled several new faces and improved to 39-43, missing the playoffs by just a single game. However, not all of the changes were for the better, in a trade that would haunt the team for years to come, the Warriors swapped Robert Parish and their 1980 first-round draft pick to the Boston Celtics for the first and 13th picks in the Draft. The Warriors used the Number one pick to select Joe Barry Carroll. The 7-foot center would ring up six seasons of at least 17.0 ppg, but Parish would go on to win three championships with the Celtics, teaming with Larry Bird and Kevin McHale on one of the best front lines in NBA history.

1981/82
:
The Warriors led by recent acquisitions Bernard King and World B. Free increased their win total by six games, to 45-37, finishing fourth place in the Pacific Division. However, for the second straight year missed the playoffs by just one game.

1982/83:
Bernard King jumped to the New York Knicks, leaving behind a team decimated by injuries. Overall, the Warriors missed 238 player-games because of injury or illness, the most ever recorded by an NBA team at the time. A total of 19 different players donned the Warriors uniform during the year, as the team staggered to a 30-52 record, finishing in fifth place.

1983/84
:
With Pervis Short, John Barry Carroll, and Eric "Sleepy" Floyd as the top scorers  the Warriors tallied a 37-45 record, finishing in fifth place in the Pacific Division and out of the playoffs for the seventh straight season.

1984/85
:
With Joe Barry Carroll choosing to play in Italy the Warriors struggled all season finishing dead last with an awful 22-60 record.

1985/86:
The Warriors show signs of improvement, as Joe Barry Carroll returned, but still finish in last place in the Pacific Division with a 30-52 record, missing the playoffs for the ninth straight season.

1986/87
:
An ownership change and new Coach George Karl seem to be just the remedy as the Warriors make the playoffs for the first time in a decade by finishing in 3rd place with a 42-40 record. In the playoffs the Warriors would beat the Utah Jazz in a hard fought five game series. However, in the second round the Warriors would fall four games to one to the Los Angeles Lakers. In their Game 4 win versus the Lakers Eric "Sleepy" Floyd had the game of his life scoring 51 points.

1987/88
:
The success of the previous year evaporated in a season of transitions and transactions for the Warriors. Golden State took a step toward credibility when they lured Don Nelson away from Milwaukee to serve as the team's General Manager. Nelson went to work immediately, engineering one of the season's biggest trades in December when he sent Joe Barry Carroll and Eric "Sleepy" Floyd to Houston in exchange for Ralph Sampson and Steve Harris. The Warriors would go on to finish in sixth place with a disappointing 20-62 record. Following the season Don Nelson would assume coaching duties replacing George Karl who resigned in March.

1988/89: After struggling in his first few season on and off the court, Chris Mullin stepped out of rehab and became one of the league's best players. With Mullin leading the way with 26.5 ppg the Warriors made the playoffs by finishing in fourth place with a 43-39 record. In the playoffs the Warriors would hit another gear stunning the Midwest Division Champion Utah Jazz in a three game sweep. However, the Warriors run would end in the second round as they are knocked off by the Phoenix Suns in five games.

1989/90
:
The Warriors led the league in scoring (116.3 ppg) and compiled a franchise-record .809 free-throw percentage while setting an NBA record for the fewest offensive rebounds per game in a season (11.2). However, the Warriors would miss the playoffs by finishing in fifth place with a 37-45 record.

1990/91
:
The trio of Tim Hardaway, Mitch Richmond, and Chris Mullin, collectively known as "Run TMC" came together as an explosive group, totaling 72.5 points per game and leading the Warriors to their best regular-season record in nine years at 44-38. In the playoffs the Warriors would again pull of the upset beating the Midwest Champion San Antonio Spurs three games to one. However, in the second round they would fall to the Los Angeles Lakers in five games. Following the season Run TMC would be broken up as Mitch Richmond is traded to the Sacramento Kings for top draft choice Bill Owens.

1991/92
:
The Warriors were even stronger as the trade of Mitch Richmond enabled the defense to improve. Chris Mullin who was named to the original dream team continued to be the Warriors top player finishing 3rd in scoring at 25.6 ppg. However, in the playoffs the Warriors would be stunned in the first round by the Seattle Supersonics falling three games to one.

1992/93
:
The Warriors are severely bitten by the injury bug, as 14 players were sidelined for a combined 312 player-games. The four top players Chirrs Mullin who missed nearly half the season with a torn ligament in his right thumb, Tim Hardaway who sat out 16 games with a bruised right knee, Sarunas Marciulionis, who broke his right leg and dislocated his right ankle in a jogging accident before the season, returned to play 30 games, then sat out the rest of the year with Achilles tendonitis; and Billy Owens who missed 45 games with a knee injury were on the court at the same time for a total of two minutes and 37 seconds. The fragmented team managed just a 34-48 record and failed to qualify for the playoffs.

1993/94
:
The injury plague continued as the Warriors lost Tim Hardaway and Sarunas Marciulionis for the entire season and Chris Mullin for the first 20 games. However, a strong Rookie of the Year season from Chris Webber, and the continued improvement of second year man Latrell Sprewell enabled the Warriors to finish in third Place with a 50-32 record. However, the young stars would falter in the playoffs as the Warriors are swept in three straight games by the Phoenix Suns.

1994/95
:
The Warriors made a number of deals to toughen the team in the middle acquiring Ron Siekly from the Miami Heat. However, before the season even started the team fell apart. Rookie of the Year Webber began the season by exercising his option to become a restricted free agent, claiming irreconcilable differences with Head Coach Don Nelson. He asked to be traded, and the Warriors obliged, sending the 1994 Rookie of the Year to the Washington Bullets in exchange for third-year forward Tom Gugliotta and three first-round draft choices. Gugliotta would later be traded to the Minnesota Timberwolves for rookie forward Donyell Marshall, the Number four overall pick in the 1994 NBA Draft.  Without Webber the Warriors would struggle leading to the resignation of Don Nelson. By season end the Warriors were in sixth place with a shattered team and a 26-56 record.

1995/96
:
The Warriors rode the young shoulders of guard Latrell Sprewell and rookie Joe Smith to post a 10-win improvement. However their 36-46 record was not good enough for a spot in the postseason.

1996/97
:
While the Oakland Coliseum underwent a complete renovation, the Golden State Warriors headed south to San Jose, struggling to a 30-52 finish in their temporary home. The season would make the end of an era as Chris Mullin was traded following the season to the Indiana Pacers.

1997/98
:
A new era began in the Bay Area as the Warriors had new uniforms, a new logo, a new arena, and a new Coach P.J. Carlesimo. However the Warriors stumbled out of the gate losing 14 of their first 15 games. Things would go from bad to worse as star guard Latrell Sprewell chokes Coach P.J. Carlesimo during an argument in practice. Sprewell would become a focal point in a league wide debate as he is suspended for the rest of the season. Without Sprewell the Warriors would struggle and would finish in 6th place with an awful 19-63 record. Following the season Sprewell would be traded to the New York Knicks, as the team and their star guard battle in the courtroom, and through the press. 

1998/99: Newcomers and Rookies help the Warriors shown signs of improvement in a lockout-shortened season. Despite playing 32 fewer games the Warriors win two more games then the previous year. However, with a 21-29 record the Warriors would miss the playoffs for the fifth year in a row.

1999/00: In a season in which the Warriors hosted the All Star extravaganza, the Warriors go through another year of transition and struggle again finishing with a terrible 19-63 record. During the season the Warriors would change coaches and establish a new foundation acquiring Larry Hughes to go along with budding second year star Antawn Jamison.

2000/01: With new Coach Dave Cowens the Warriors struggles continues as they finish in last place with a terrible 17-65 record, as Larry Hughes fails to live up to expectations.

2001/02
:
Another coaching change marks the Warriors eighth straight year without the playoffs. During the season Coach Dave Cowens would be fired and replaced by Brian Winters as the Warriors continue to be among the worst teams in the NBA finishing with the worst record in the NBA at a pathetic 21-61. Following another disappointing season the Larry Hughes would be allowed to walk away and sign with the Washington Wizards.

2002/03
:
Under new Coach Eric Musselman the Warriors would begin to shown signs of life after a slow start saw the Warriors win just four of their first 15 games, as their two young stars Gilbert Arenas, and Jason Richardson had breakout years. Richardson wowed the fans at the All-Star Game winning the Slam Dunk Contest, while Arneas was named NBA's Most Improved Player as the Warriors made a second half run at .500, and a possible playoffs spot. For the first time in nearly a decade the Warriors reached the .500 mark late in the season, holding a record of 30-30 on March 4th. However it would be the last taste of success for the Warriors as they struggled down the stretch winning just eight of their last 22 to finish in sixth place with a 38-44 record, which held them out of the playoffs for the ninth straight season. Following the season the Warriors progress was all but erased as they were forced to trade leading scorer Antwan Jamison to the Dallas Mavericks, while Gilbert Arenas was swiped up by the Washington Wizards through Free Agency.

2003/04
:
Coming off a season in which the Warriors began to show they were turning the corner the Warriors got off to a relatively good start as they held a 14-13 record after 27 games. However as the New Year began the Warriors began to struggle losing 7 straight. The Warriors would on to miss the playoffs for the 10th straight year posting a record of 37-45, while finishing 4th in the Pacific Division. Despite the poor record there were some individual bright spots as Jason Richardson continue to develop into a solid NBA player averaging a team high 18.7 PPG, while Erick Dampier pulled down 12.0 rebounds a game which was fourth best in the league. With hopes of bringing the Warriors back to the playoffs they looked to their past and named Chris Mullen as the new GM who would replace Coach Eric Musselman with Mike Montgomery who had turned around the Stanford Basketball Program in the NCAA. However they will have to move forward without their top rebounder as Dampier was traded to the Dallas Mavericks after the Warriors were unable to re-sign him.

2004/05:
The Warriors who were in a year of rebuilding and retooling got off to a slow start as they dropped their first six games on the way to an awful 3-12 start. The Warriors would finish December strong winning eight of their next 14, but when 2005 rolled around their struggles worsened as they won just one of their next 16. In last place with a 16-38 record the Warriors again retooled at the trade deadline acquiring Baron Davis from the New Orleans Hornets for Speedy Claxton. The deal would have an immediate impact as suddenly the Warriors became competitive, as Davis not only played well in his new surroundings he made everyone around him better too, as the Warriors went 18-9 the rest of the way to finish with a record of 34-48 tying the Los Angeles Lakers for fourth Place and avoiding the cellar all by themselves.

2005/06
:
After their strong finish there was renewed hope in the Bay Area for the Warriors, as they hoped to make the playoffs for the first time since 1994. Earlier on they would not disappoint as they off to a strong start thanks to the play of Baron Davis as they posted an 11-6 record in their first month. In December, the Warriors began to show some signs of trouble as they dropped five straight, but thanks to a three game winning streak to close the month they entered the New Year above .500 at 17-14 for the first time in 12 years. However, it would not last as the Warriors lost their first five games of 2006 and would never be above .500 again. In February with Baron Davis injured things would go from bad to worse as the Warriors won just four times in 13 games and ended up in last place, where they would remain for the rest of the season posting a record of 34-48 for the second straight season. However, unlike the previous year the good feelings of a strong finish were not to be found, as Coach Mike Montgomery was fired and replaced by Don Nelson, who was the Warriors Coach from 1988-1995, a period in which the Warriors made the playoffs four times, before a falling out with Chris Webber led to Nelson stepping down in the middle of the 1994/95 season, which marked the start of the Warriors 12-year playoff drought.

2006/07
:
Under Don Nelson things started well for the Warriors who won seven of their first ten games, as they got strong play from a healthy Baron Davis. However, the Warriors bad habits would once again arise, as they struggled over the next two months. On January 17th the Warriors sitting with a subpar 19-21 record decided to make a bold blockbuster trade sending Troy Murphy, Mike Dunleavy, Jr., Ike Diogu, and Keith McLeod to the Indiana Pacers for Al Harrington, Stephen Jackson, Sarunas Jasikevicius, and Josh Powell. A week late the Warriors showed signs that the deal was a good one, as they beat the New Jersey Nets in dramatic fashion 110-109 on a 17-foot jump shot at the buzzer by Monta Ellis. Still it took time to adjust as the new players besides freeing up cap space allowed, Coach Nelson to employ a faster run and gun team. After struggling through much on February, Many point to the turn around coming on March 4th following a frustrating 107-106 loss to the Washington Wizards at home that dropped their record to 26-35, as former Warrior Gilbert Arenas was awarded a technical free throw with less then a second remaining. Following that loss the Warriors won six of their next seven games. After a brief bump in the road saw them lose three of four, the Warriors really threw into overdrive winning nine of their last ten games including five straight to close the season with a 42-40 record, sneaking into the playoffs with the eighth seed, as Monta Eliis was named the NBA's Most Improved Players. A quick look at the Warriors first round match up against the 67-15 Dallas Mavericks, and it would have been easy to dismiss the Warriors as not having any shot at an upset, as they were making their first playoff appearance since 1994. However, in the regular season the Warriors handled the Mavericks well, winning all three match ups, as Don Nelson knew the Mavericks well coaching in Dallas from 1997-2005. In Game 1 the Warriors showed just how dangerous they were to the Mavericks winning 97-85, as they held MVP Dirk Nowitzki to just 14 points on 4-of-16 shooting. After the Mavs won 112-99 in Game 2, the series shifted to Oakland where a frenzied crowd hungry for playoff basketball lifted the Warriors to a 109-91 win, as Jason Richardson scored a game high 30 points. The Warriors magic continued in Game 4, as Baron Davis closed the first half with a three point bank shot to close the first half. With the crowd seemingly going crazy threw halftime the Warriors rallied to win 103-99, as Davis led the way with 33 points to give the Warriors a stunning 3-1 series lead. The Mavericks would hold off elimination with a 118-112 win in Game 5. However, as the series returned to the Oracle Arena in Game 6 it was all Warriors as they completed the historic upset with a 111-86 win, powered by 36 points in the 3rd Quarter, led by Stephen Jackson who scored a game high 33 points. In the second round against the Utah Jazz the Warriors would stumble losing the first two games on the road, including a frustrating overtime loss in Game 2, where the Warriors scored just four points in OT. Coming home the Warriors were revived once again as Baron Davis scored 32 points with 9 assists and 6 steals to lead the way in 125-105 win in Game 3. However, in Game 4 the Jazz would run away at the end scoring 40 points in the 4th Quarter to take a 3-1 series lead with a 115-101 win, as they went on to end the Warriors magical run in five games winning the finale 100-87.

2007/08
:
Coming off their first playoff appearance in 13 years the Warriors stumbled out of the gate losing their first six games as Stephen Jackson was suspended for seven games for an arrest with a firearm. The Warriors would quickly recover winning eight of their next nine games as Jackson returned, to close the first month with an 8-7 record. The Warriors played solid basketball in December with an 11-6 record. As the New Year began the Warriors went into a mini slump losing three of their first four games in 2008. However, they would still post a 9-6 record for the month. However, in a Western Conference with eight teams on the way to 50 wins the Warriors were in a tough position in terms of making a return to the playoffs. To help the team make down the stretch the Warriors signed Chris Webber, whose career had come full circle returning to Golden State where he won the 1994 NBA Rookie of the Year, before a contract dispute led to him being traded to the Washington Bullets. The Warriors played well in February, but Webber could not give them the help they needed as continued knee issues led to the former All-Star playing in just nine games before he was released, as he announced his retirement shortly there after. Heading into April the Warriors were still in the playoff chase as they held a 45-28. However, down the stretch they would struggle, winning just three of their last nine games, as they fell just two games short of a return of the playoffs, despite a 48-34 record that was better then their 2007 season, when they reached the second round of the playoffs. Following the season the Warriors would be stunned by the departure of Baron Davis, as their star point guard signed with the Los Angeles Clippers.

2008/09
:
For the Warriors who narrowly missed a second straight trip to the playoffs, things got off to a bad start right away, as they were without Monta Ellis, who was injured while riding a moped during the off-season. The Warriors would suspend Ellis for 30 games for participating in a dangerous activity that would force him to miss the entire first half the season. While the team signed Corey Maggette to replace Baron Davis, things did not start of well for the Warriors, as they lost 15 of their first 20 games. When Ellis finally returned on January 23rd the Warriors were already out of the playoff picture at 13-30. Ellis would have a strong game scoring 20 points in his return, but the Warriors would lose to the Cleveland Cavaliers 106-105. Ellis would struggle in the early going and would miss several more games, before finishing the season strong with 23.5 ppg. However, the Warriors suffered through another lousy season, finishing in third place in the Pacific Division with a record of 29-53.

2009/10: Change was in the air by the bay as the Warriors declined to renew the contract of General Manager Chris Mullin, as Larry Riley took over. Changes would also take place on the court, as Jamal Crawford was traded to the Atlanta Hawks for Acie Law and Speedy Claxton. The deals would continue into the season as Stephen Jackson and Acie Law were traded to the Charlotte Bobcats for Raja Bell and Vladimir Radmanovic in November. Not much could be expected for a team in transition like the Warriors as they started the season with a 6-10 record through November. Things would only get worse in December, as they went through a 12 game stretch, where they won just one game, and it was against the lowly New Jersey Nets. Long slumps would be common for the Warriors as they had another 1-10 stretch in January, once again their lone win came against the Nets. The Warriors would never factor in the playoff race as they posted a terrible 26-56 record. One bright spot was the play of Stephen Curry, who was selected with the seventh overall pick in the NBA Draft. Curry would finish second in Rookie of the Year voting, while posting 17.5 points and 5.9 assists per game. While Curry provided a vision of the future, Coach Don Nelson reached new heights in the coaching fraternity as he became the NBA's all-time winningest coach on April 7th with a 116-107 win over the Minnesota Timberwolves on the road. The win was the 1,333rd of Nelson's career moving him past Lenny Wilkens. Nelson would finish the season with a career record of 1,335-1,063.

2010/11
:
It was back to the future for the Warriors as they returned to the classic blue and gold, while featuring a logo and uniforms inspired by the classic city look with the new eastern span of the Oakland Bay Bridge instead of the Golden Gate Bridge. As the season began the Warriors also had new owners as a 19 person group led by Joe Lacob and Peter Guber took over management, while the team also had a new coach in the name of Keith Smart, as Don Nelson retired before training camp. With Monta Ellis scoring 46 points the new look Warriors started the season with a win at home, beating the Houston Rockets 132-128. The Warriors would get off to a good start, winning six of their first eight games. However, with a tough road schedule in November, the good start would not last as they would lose 16 of their next 19 games. After entering the New Year with a record of 13-19, the Warriors struggles continued in January as every time they appeared to be ready to turn things around they went back into a slump. Heading into the All-Star Break the Warriors would get hot again, winning eight of ten to get within three games of .500. However, the momentum was quickly lost as they dropped their first four games after the break. The Warriors would never again be able to get that type of momentum as they went on to finish the season with a record of 36-46, which was a ten game improvement. However, it was not enough to impress management as Coach Keith Smart was fired and replaced by Mark Jackson after the season.

2011/12
:
In their 50th season by the bay, frustrations began to boil over for Warriors fans, whose best news came off the court as they began to make plans for a new arena in San Francisco, near the bay bridge. The season which was delayed by a lockout saw yet another new coach for the Warriors as Mark Jackson was hired to turn things around.  The Warriors started the season with four straight games at home, which they managed to split. As the New Year began the Warriors stepped on the road, and struggled as they dropped six of their first seven games in2012. The Warriors would struggle through January, as they closed the month with a record of 7-12. The Warriors would show some signs of life in February as they posted a 7-6 record, and were on the fringe of the playoff chase. The Warriors continued to ply well until March 13th, when they stunned and angered their fans by trading leading scorer Monta Ellis, who was averaging 21.9 ppg along with Ekpe Udoh and Kwame Brown to the Milwaukee Bucks for Stephen Jackson and Andrew Bogut, who was injured and out for the remainder of the season. The Warriors than traded Jackson to the San Antonio Spurs for Richard Jefferson, T.J. Ford and a conditional draft pick. Ford retired before ever playing a game with the Warriors. The Warriors would lose their next four games as Owner Joe Lacob was booed on the night the team retired the number of Chris Mullin. The Warriors would play terrible basketball the rest of the season, as they finished the season with a record of 23-43.

2012/13
:
Change was in the air all through the Bay Area, as the Warriors coming off a year that saw them remake their roster, announced plans to build a new arena in San Francisco that would open in 2017. All Warriors fans wanted was to see a team that could compete, as anger over the team's losing ways were the first thing the Warriors needed to overcome. The Warriors showed signs early that they were going to be more competitive as they, posted a winning record in November, which included road wins over the Los Angeles Lakers and Oklahoma City Thunder. The Warriors would be even better in December, as they won 12 of 16 games, including a 97-95 win over the Miami Heat on December 12th, as they won six of seven on a Eastern Road swing. A driving force for the Warriors strong start was Stephen Curry who became the face of the franchise, leading the team with 22.9 ppg as he became one of the top three point assassins in the league. Meanwhile David Lee was named to the All-Star team with 18.5 points and 11.2 rebounds per game, ending Golden State's 16 year drought without a representative in the All-Star Game. The Warriors also had a breakout season from Klay Thompson another second generation player, who in his second NBA season averaged 16.6 ppg, and stated all 82 games. The rigors of a long season would wear on the Warriors in January as Curry dealt with injuries as the Warriors lost five of six games, but kept their heads above water with a winning record in the month at 8-7. The Warriors continued to have their struggles in February, losing six straight around the All-Star Break. However, as the month came to an end, Curry had one of his best efforts, scoring 54 points during a 109-105 loss to the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden on February 27th. Despite the struggles the Warriors remained above .500 and began to get back on track in March, with a 9-7 record. The Warriors would go on to make the playoffs with the sixth seed as they finished with a solid record of 47-35.

2013 Playoffs: Making just their second playoff appearance in 19 years, the Warriors faced the Denver Nuggets in the opening round. The Warriors gave the Nuggets all they could handle in the opener, as they led most of the game. However, late in the fourth quarter David Lee suffered a torn hip flexor as the Nuggets rallied to win the game 97-95. Without Lee, the Warriors rallied around Stephen Curry in Game 2, as he led the way with 30 points as the Warriors gained the split in Denver with a 131-117 shootout win. Curry would lead the way again with 29 points and 11 assists in Game 3, as the Warriors edged the Nuggets 110-108. Stephen Curry continued to carry the Warriors, scoring 31 points to lead Golden State to a 115-101 win in Game 4, for a 3-1 series lead. After the Nuggets stayed alive with a 107-100 win in Game 5, the Warriors go an unexpected boost for Game 6, as David Lee who was expected to be lost for the rest of the season returned to the lineup. The emotional boost was enough as Andrew Bogut had 21 rebounds as the Warriors won 92-88 in Oakland to reach the second round. Things would be tougher in the second round, as the Warriors faced the San Antonio Spurs. Heading into the series the Warriors had not won in San Antonio since 1997. The Warriors appeared to be heading for a breakthrough in Game 1, as they held a double digit lead in the fourth quarter. However, the Spurs rallied to tie the game and would go on to win in double overtime 129-127. Rather than be defeated by focusing on the one that got away, the Warriors again outplayed the Spurs in Game 2, this time they would get a 100-91 win as Klay Thompson scored 34 points and 14 boards. However, with a chance to take control of the series in Game 3 in Oakland, the Warriors came out flat as the Spurs built a 32-23 lead and never looked back, winning the game 102-92. Game 4 would be a must win for the Warriors and would be tight battle all the way, going into overtime tied 84-84. In overtime it would be all Warriors, as Golden Stat evened the series with a 97-87 win, as Harrison Barnes had a game high 26 points, while Andre Bogut had 18 boards. Barnes would have another big game, with 25 points in Game 5 but it would not be enough as the Spurs won 109-91. The Spurs would go on to win the series in six games, winning the finale 94-82. Despite the loss in Game 6, the Warriors received a standing ovation from fans at the Oracle Arena as their season came to an end, as for the first time in years there was genuine hope in bay.



52nd Season
First Game Played October 23, 1962
 
 
 
 
 
Address:
1011 Broadway
Oakland, CA 94607
Phone: (510) 986-2200


Web:
http://www.warriors.com
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Coaches: (24)
Bob Feerick 1962/63
Alex Hannum 1963/64-1965/66
Bill Sharman 1966/67-1967/68
George Lee 1968/69-1969/70
Al Attles 1969/70-1979/80
John Bach 1979/80
Al Attles 1980/81-1982/83
John Bach 1983/84-1985/86
George Karl 1986/87-1987/88
Ed Gregory 1987/88
Don Nelson 1988/89-1994/95
Donn Nelson 1994/95
Bob Lanier 1994/95
Rick Adelman 1995/96-1996/97
P.J. Carlisiemo 1997/98-1999/00
Gary St. Jean 1999/00
Dave Cowens  2000/01-2001/02
Brian Winters 2001/02
Eric Musselman  2002/03-2003/04
Mike Montgomery 2003/04-2005/06
Don Nelson 2006/07-2009/10
Keith Smart 2010/11
Mark Jackson 2011/12-2013/14
Steve Kerr 2014/15-Present
 
 
 
Arenas: (7)
Cow Palace 1962-1964
Civic Auditorium 1964-1966
USF Memorial Gym 1964-1966
Cow Palace 1966-1971
Oakland Coliseum 1971-1996
San Jose Arena 1996/97
Oracle Arena* 1997-Presen
t
*-Known as The Arena in Oakland 97-06
 
NBA Champions: (1)
1975

NBA Finals: (3)
1964, 1967, 1975

Conference Finals: (6)
1964, 1967, 1968, 1973, 1975, 1976

Division Champions: (4)
1964, 1967, 1975, 1976

Playoff Appearences: (18)
1964, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1987, 1989, 1991, 1992, 1994, 2007, 2013, 2014
 
 
Hall of Famers: (16)
Rick Barry F 1965-1967, 1972-1978
Wilt Chamberlain C 1962-1965
Tom Gola F 1962/63
Alex Hannum Coach 1963-1966
Bernard KIng F 1980-1982
Jerry Lucas F 1969-1971

Saruna Marciulionis F 1989-1993
Chris Mullin G 1985-1997, 2000/01
Don Nelson Coach 1988-95, 2006-10

Robert Parish C 1976-1980
Mitch Richmond G 1988-1991
Guy Rodgers G 1962-1966
Ralph Sampson C 1987-1989
Bill Sharman Coach 1966-1968

Nate Thurmond G 1963-1974
Jamaal Wilkes F 1974-1977
 
 
 
 
Retired Numbers: (6)
13 Wilt Chamberlain C 1959-1965
14 Tom Meschery F 1960-1967
16 Al Attles G 1960-1971
17 Chris Mullin, F 1986-97, 2000/01
24 Rick Barry F 1965-67, 1972-78
42 Nate Thurmond G 1963-1974
 
 
NBA All-Star Games Hosted: (2)
1967, 2000

NBA All-Star Game MVP
: (1)

1967 Rick Barry F
 
 
AWARDS
NBA Coach of the Year: (2)
1964 Alex Hannum
1992 Don Nelson

NBA Most Improved Player: (2)
2003 Gilbert Arenas G
2007 Monta Ellis G

NBA Rookie of the Year: (4)
1966 Rick Barry F
1975 Keith Wilkes F
1989 Mitch Richmond G
1994 Chris Webber F


NBA 6th Man:
None

NBA Defensive Player of the Year:
None

NBA MVP:
None

 
 
 
NBA Finals MVP: (1)
1975 Rick Barry F
 
 
Best Season:
1975/76 (59-23)

Worst Season
:
2000/01 (17-65)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
On the Air:
Television:
Comcast Sports Net Bay Area

Radio:

KNBR (680 AM); KTCT (1050 AM)

Broadcasters:
Jim Barnett and Bob Fitzgerald-TV, Tim Roye-Radio
 
 
Alternate Logo
2010-Present
©MMXIV Tank Productions. Stats researched by Frank Fleming, all information, and team names are property of the National Basketball Association.  This site is not affiliated with the Golden State Warriors of the NBA.  This site is maintained for research purposes only.  All logos used on this page were from Chris Creamer's Sports Logos Page.
Page created on October 4, 2002. Last updated on July 22, 2014 at 11:20 pm ET.

Back to NBA Main

Western Conference Index


Home

Played As:
Philadelphia Warriors 1946/47-1961/62

San Francisco Warriors 1962/63-1970/71
Golden State Warriors 1971/72-Present

Logo
2010-Present
D-League Affiliate:
Santa Cruz Warriors
Cheerleaders:
Warriors Girls
Tweet
Visit our Sponsors
Partner of USA TODAY Sports Digital Properties