Nickname:
Businessman Charles Adams wanted his new franchise to have colors to match his Brookside Stores as well as a name equated with strength and power.

 
Coach:
Claude Julien 2007/08-

Stadium
:
TD Garden 1995/96-

 
Historical Moments:

1924/25: On November 1st the Boston Bruins made their debut as the first American team in the NHL defeating the Montreal Maroons at home 2-1. However, success would not be common for the first year Bruins as they lost their next 11 games on the way to finishing in last place with a 6-24 record.

1925/26
:
In their second season the Bruins get off to a terrible start going winless in their first 15 games. However, the team would gel down the stretch and would win 17 of their final 21 games to finish with a 17-5-4 record, food enough for fourth place.

1926/27
:
Defenseman Eddie Shore asserts himself as an instant force in his first season with the Bruins. Led by Shore the Bruins would make the playoff for the first time by finishing second in the American Division with a 21-20-3 record. In the playoffs the Bruins would play some of their best hockey of the season advancing to the Stanley Cup Finals by beating the Chicago Blackhawks and New York Rangers in total goal series. However, in the Finals the Bruins would go through a scoring drought as they fall to the Ottawa Senators in a four game series in which the Bruins could only muster two ties.

1927/28: Led by Goalie Hal Winkler who posts 15 shutouts in 44 games the Bruins win their first division title with a solid 20-13-11 record. However, in the semifinals the Bruins would be stunned by the New York Rangers in a two-game total goal series 5-2 allowing four goals on home ice in Game 2.

1928/29: On November 20th the Bruins open the Boston Garden by losing to the Montreal Canadiens 1-0. However, it was just a minor setback as the Bruins won their division for the second straight season with a 26-13-5 record. In the semifinals the Bruins would get revenge for opening night by sweeping the Canadiens in 3 straight, led by two shutouts from Goalie Tiny Thompson. In the first All-American Stanley Cup Finals the Bruins claim their first championship by beating the New York Rangers in two straight games.

1929/30
:
Coming off their first Stanley Cup Championship the Bruins dominate the NHL finishing with a league-best 38-5-1 record. Along the way enjoying a 14-game winning streak as Cooney Weiland leads the league in scoring. In the playoffs the Bruins continued to roll as they knocked off the Montreal Maroons three games to one. However, in the finals they would lose two straight games for the first time all season falling to the Montreal Canadiens.

1930/31
:
The Bruins continue their dominance of the American Division finishing in first place for the fourth straight year with a 28-10-6 record. However in the playoffs the Bruins would lose in heartbreaking fashion losing to the Montreal Canadiens in overtime of Game 5.

1931/32: In a year of disappointments for the Bruins, Dutch Gainor, is traded away for a player, Joe Jerwa, who doesn't play a game all season in a Bruins uniform, as the Bruins finish in last place with a disappointing 15-21-12 record. 

1932/33
:
The Bruins rebound behind Vezina winning goalie Tiny Thompson and Hart Trophy winner Eddie Shore to reclaim the American Division Championship with a 25-15-8 record. However in the playoffs the Bruins would fall in a fifth game overtime again losing to the Toronto Maple Leafs in a series that included four overtime games including the longest game in NHL history at 104 minutes.

1933/34: In a season he would like to forget Eddie Shore sits out the first game holding out for a $7,500 contract. However things would get worse when he returned as he is suspended 16-games after a vicious hit land on Ace Bailey ends the Toronto Maple Leafs star's career. Without Shore the Burins would fall into last place with an 18-25-5 record.

1934/35: Eddie Shore returns and wins the Hart Trophy as the Bruins rebound to recapture the American Division with a 26-16-6 record. However, in the playoffs the Bruins would fall to the Toronto Maple Leafs in four games.

1935/36
:
Tiny Thompson remain the rock of Gibraltar in net as he starts all 50 games while recording the first two assist ever by a goalie, during a 22-20-6 season in which the Bruins finish in second place. However, the Bruins playoff failure would continue as they usually reliable Thompson is rocked by eight goals in Game 2 of a total Goal series against the Toronto Maple Leafs.

1936/37: Despite the loss of Eddie Shore for the season the Bruins make the playoffs by finishing in second place with a 23-18-7 record. However, once again the Bruins would be tripped up right away falling to the Montreal Maroons in a three game series.

1937/38:
With Tiny Thompson winning the Vezina and Eddie Shore winning the Hart Trophy the Bruins dominate the NHL all season finishing with a league best 30-11-7 record. However, in the playoffs the Burins would be knocked off quickly as they are swept by the Toronto Maple Leafs in three straight games.

1938/39:
In a shocking move Tiny Thompson is sold to the Detroit Red Wings early in the season as Frankie Brimsek takes over in net. Brimsek as a spectacular rookie season wining both the Calder Trophy and Vezina as the Bruins finish at top the seven team league with a 31-12-5 record. In the semifinals the Bruins rely on Mel Hill who scores three overtime goals including one in Game 7 to knock off the New York Rangers. In the finals things would go much easier as the Bruins won their second Stanley Cup by beating the Toronto Maple Leafs in five games.

1939/40
:
Despite the trade of Eddie Shore the Bruins finish with regular season title again with a 31-12-5 record, as Milt Schmidt, Woody Dumart, and Bob Bauer finish 1-2-3- in the league in scoring. However, in the playoffs the Bruins would be knocked off by the New York Rangers in six games.

1940/41
:
The Bruins dominate the NHL again losing just one game between January and March to finish with a 27-8-13 record, as Bill Cowley lead the league in scoring while winning the Hart Trophy. In the semifinals the Bruins would rally from a 3-2 deficit to beat the Toronto Maple Leafs in seven games. In the finals the Bruins would find thing much easier as they swept the Detroit Red Wings in four straight games to win their second Cup in three years.

1941/42
:
World War II begins, and the Bruins lose numerous key players to the war, including the famous Kraut Line of Milt Schmidt, Bobby Bauer and Woody Dumart. Without their top offensive line the Bruins fall to third place with a 25-17-6 record. In the playoffs the Bruins would squeeze by the Chicago Blackhawks in three games, before being swept by the Detroit Red Wings in two straight games in the semifinals.

1942/43
:
Depleted by World War II the Bruins sign 16-year-old Bep Guidolin, who joins the team as the youngest player in the history of the NHL. With the "Sprout Line" of Bill Shill, Don Gallinger and Guidolin leading the way the Bruins finish in second place with a 24-17-9 record. In the playoffs the Bruins would advance to the finals by knocking off the Montreal Canadiens in five games. However in the finals they would be swept aside by the Detroit Red Wings in four straight games.

1943/44
:
Herb Cain wracks up 82 points to break the record formerly held by Cooney Weiland. However Goalie Frank Brimsek is lost to the Coast Guard for the duration of the war, and Bert Gardiner struggles in net with a 5.17 GAA, as the Bruins miss the playoffs by finishing in fifth place with a 19-26-5 record.

1944/45
:
Still ravaged by war the Bruins struggle again to finish with an awful 16-30-4 record. However by finishing 4th they still manage to qualify for the playoffs. In the playoffs the Bruins would show some unexpected spark as they jumped out to a 3-1 series lead over the Detroit Red Wings. However, the Wings would rally to win the next three games eliminating the Bruins in seven games.

1945/46:
Frank Brimsek and the Kraut Line of Milt Schmidt, Bobby Bauer and Woody Dumart, return from the war, as the Bruins finish in second place with a 24-18-8 record. In the playoffs the now fully armed Bruins would knock off the Detroit Red wings in five games. However, in the Finals the Bruins would fall in five games themselves to the Montreal Canadiens.

1946/47
:
The Kraut Line once again led the team in scoring, as the Bruins finish in third place with a record of 26-23-11. However, in the playoffs the Bruins would be knocked out by the Montreal Canadiens in five games. 

1947/48:
Age begins to catch up with Bruins as Bobby Bauer retires, and the Bruins post a losing record at 23-24-13 finishing in third place. In the playoffs it would be a quick exit as the Bruins are buried by the Toronto Maple Leafs in five games.

1948/49
:
In celebration of the team's 25th anniversary the Bruins debut new uniforms featuring the now familiar Spoked B. With another solid season from Frank Brimsek who fought through the tragic death of his young son, the Bruins finish in second place with a 29-23-8 record. However, in the playoffs the Bruins would be upended quickly by the Toronto Maple Leafs in five games.

1949/50
:
Jack Gelineau takes over between the pipes for all but three games of the regular season and earns the Calder Trophy. However, the Bruins lose 10 of their final 13 games and finishing in fifth place with a 22-32-16 record, missing the playoffs for the first time in six years.

1950/51
:
Milt Schmidt leads the team in scoring with 61 points and brings home the Hart Trophy as the league MVP, as the Bruins sneak into the playoffs by finishing in fourth place with a 22-30-18 record. However, in the playoffs the Bruins would be knocked out by the Toronto Maple Leafs four games to one in a series that also included a 1-1 tie.

1951/52:
Both Woody Dumart and Milt Schmidt score the 200th goals of their careers. The third member of the Kraut line, Bobby Bauer, comes out of retirement for the March 18th game to help Schmidt achieve his 200th goal. The Bruins would go on to finish in fourth place with a 25-29-16 record. In the playoffs the Bruins would give the Montreal Canadiens all they could handle before falling in seven games.

1952/53:
With Sugar Jim Henry posting a solid 2.46 GAA the Bruins finish in third place with a 28-29-13 record. In the playoffs the Bruins would play some of their best hockey all season as they stunned the Detroit Red Wings in 6 games. However, in the finals the Bruins would be rolled over by the Montreal Canadiens in 5 games. 

1953/54
:
The Bruins lead the league in penalty minutes with 685, as they finish in fourth place with a 23-28-10 record. However in the playoffs the Bruins who were playing without Bill Quackenbush and Real Chevrefils are swept by the Montreal Canadiens.

1954/55: The remaining two members of the famous Kraut Line, Woody Dumart and Milt Schmidt, hang up their skates, as the Bruins finish in fourth place and make the playoffs despite a losing record at 23-26-21. In the playoffs the Bruins would be bounced by the Montreal Canadiens in five games.

1955/56
:
The Bruins struggle to score all season, as they score a league low 147 goals while being shutout 11 times and missing the playoffs by finishing in fifth place with a 23-34-13 record.

1956/57
:
Despite losing goalie Terry Sawchuck to mono, and the retirement of Hal Laycoe and Bill Quackenbush the Bruins make the playoffs by finishing in third place with a solid 34-24-12 record. In the playoffs the Bruins would make the finals by stunning the Detroit Red Wings in five games. However, in the finals the Bruins would score just six goals as they are dominated by the Montreal Canadiens in five games.

1957/58:
The Bruins make history on January 18th when Willie O'Ree the first black man in the NHL, plays his first game. O'Ree would only play two games that season and 45 games in his career, but his contribution would be remembered for season to come. The integrated Bruins would make the playoffs by finishing in fourth place with a 27-25-15 record. In the playoffs the Bruins would reach the finals by knocking off the New York Rangers in six games, in the final two games the Bruins offense exploded for 14 goals. However, they would hit a brick wall in the finals, as they are beat by the Montreal Canadiens in six games.

1958/59
:
Five Bruins record hat tricks as the team finishes in second place with a respectful 32-29-9 record. However in the playoffs the Bruins would fall in the first round in a hard fought seven game series to the Toronto Maple Leafs.

1959/60
:
Bronco Horvath enjoys a 22-game point scoring streak, finishing second in the NHL in scoring. However, the Bruins struggle down the stretch and miss the playoff by three points with a 28-34-8 record.

1960/61: The Bruins struggle all season winning just two games on the road during the season while allowing the most goals in the league at 254, and finishing in last place with an awful 15-42-13 record.

1961/62:
The Bruins stumble out of the gate losing the first eight games. In addition the Bruins would also suffer a 20-game winless streak as they missed the playoffs by finishing in last place with a 15-47-8 record. With an eye on the future the Bruins sign 14-year old Bobby Orr to a developmental deal.

1962/63
:
The Bruins struggle continue as they finish in last place for the third year in row with a pathetic 14-39-17 record, while a league high allowing 287 goals.

1963/64:
The Bruins continue to reside in the NHL basement failing to win 29 games again with an 18-40-12 record.

1964/65
:
The Bruins start the season in the hole again with going winless through their first nine games, as they finished in last for the fourth straight season with a 21-43-6 record.

1965/66:
The Bruins would manage to escape the basement as the finished with a 21-43-6 record for the second year in a row, but miss the playoffs for the eighth straight season.

1966/67
:
Defenseman Bobby Orr makes his debut as he finishes third in scoring for the Bruins with 41 points and earns the Calder Trophy. However, the Bruins would fall back into last place with a 17-43-10 record.

1967/68
:
In the first season of expansion the Bruins make the playoffs for the first time in tem years by finishing in third place in the Eastern Division with a 37-27-10 record, as Bobby Orr wins his first Norris Trophy. However, in the playoffs the inexperienced Bruins would be swept in four straight games by the Montreal Canadiens.

1968/69
:
With Phil Esposito winning the Hart Trophy while leading the league in scoring and Bobby Orr taking his second straight Norris Trophy the Bruins post 100 points for the first time in franchise history as they finish in second place with a solid 42-18-16 record. In the first round the Bruins would sweep away the Toronto Maple Leafs in four straight games. However, in the semifinals the Bruins would fall to the Montreal Canadiens in six games.

1969/70: Bobby Orr has one of the most dominant seasons in NHL history as he wins the league scoring title with 87 assists, and Hart Trophy while winning his third straight Norris Trophy, as the Bruins finish in second Place with a 40-17-19 record. In the first round the Bruins would struggle with the New York Rangers as they split the first four games. However the Bruins would straighten out and win the next 2. In the semifinals the Bruins would easily oust the Chicago Blackhawks scoring 20 goals in a four game sweep. In the finals the Bruins would dominate the St. Louis Blues winning the first three games by a combined score of 16-4. With their first cup in 29 years in reach the Bruins were taken to overtime. However, the game would be decided quickly as Bobby Orr, who would win the Conn Smythe trophy scored the game winner by flying through the air 40 seconds into overtime.

1970/71:
The Bruins set 37 individual and team NHL records, as they finish in first place for the first time in 30 years with a 57-14-7 record, as Bobby Orr wins his 3rd straight Norris, and his second straight Hart Trophy. However, in the playoffs the Bruins would be knocked off by their nemesis the Montreal Canadiens in seven games.

1971/72:
The Bruins dominance continues as Bobby Orr wins the Norris and Hart again while finishing in first place with a 54-13-11 record. In the playoffs the Bruins would knock off the Toronto Maple Leafs in five games, before sweeping the St. Louis Blues in four straight games to reach the Finals. In the Finals it was all Bruins again as they won their second Stanley Cup in three years by beating the New York Rangers in six games, as Bobby Orr, once again round out his hardware collection by claiming the Conn Smythe Award. 

1972/73:
Bobby Orr wins his fourth straight Norris Trophy as the Bruins finish in second place with a solid 51-22-5 record. However, in the playoffs the Bruins would be upended by the New York Rangers in five games.

1973/74
:
Phil Esposito compiles 145 points to win the scoring title for the fourth consecutive year, as he takes home his second career Hart Trophy, while Bobby Orr wins his fifth straight Norris Trophy, as the Bruins finish in first place with a league best 52-17-9 record. In the first round the Bruins would quickly sweep away the Toronto Maple Leafs in four straight games before ousting the Chicago Blackhawks in six games. However, in the finals the Bruins would be stunned by the Philadelphia Flyers in six games.

1974/75
:
Bobby Orr wins the scoring title with 135 points while wining his eighth consecutive Norris Trophy for his defensive work, as the Bruins finish in second place in the 40-26-14 record. However, in the expanded playoffs the Bruins would be knocked off by the Chicago Blackhawks in the preliminary round in a three game series.

1975/76
:
Bobby Orr undergoes two knee operations and is limited to just ten games, including his last in a Bruins uniform. The injury forced the Bruins into trading for defensive help, and that meant trading Phil Esposito the New York Rangers for Brad Park and Jean Rattelle. The trade helped the Bruins immensely as they lose just ten games after the November deal while winning the Adams Division with 48-15-17 record. After a first Round Bye the Bruins would be pushed to the limit by the Los Angeles Kings before winning the series in Game 7. However, in the semis the Bruins would be knocked out by the Philadelphia Flyers in five games.  

1976/77
:
With Jean Ratelle leading the team in scoring the Bruins win the Adams Division with a 49-23-8 record. In the playoffs after a first round bye the Bruins would beat the Los Angeles Kings in a high scoring six game series. In the semifinals the Bruins would sweep the Philadelphia Flyers in four straight games, winning two key road games in overtime. However, in the Finals the Bruins would be swept by the Montreal Canadiens that set records for wins and points during the season.

1977/78
:
Terry O'Reilly becomes the first player in NHL history to finish with 200 or more penalty minutes and finish in the top ten in scoring, as he leads the Bruins with 90 points, as the Bruins win the Adams Division with a 51-18-11 record. In the playoffs the Bruins would make the Finals for the second year in a row by sweeping the Chicago Blackhawks and beating the Philadelphia Flyers in five games. However, in the Finals the Bruins would be beaten by the Montreal Canadiens in six games.

1978/79
:
The Bruins are not shut out the entire season, as they win the Adams Division again with a 43-23-14 record. In the playoffs the Bruins would make the semifinals by sweeping the Pittsburgh Penguins in four straight games. However, facing the Montreal Canadiens in the semis the Bruins would fall in seven games losing the decisive seventh game in overtime, after the Habs tied the game on power play following a too many men on the ice penalty.

1979/80
:
The Bruins draft Ray Bourque, who sets the NHL record for most points by a rookie defenseman with 65, winning the Calder Trophy. After finishing in second place in the Adams Division with a 46-21-13 record, the Bruins survive a five game series with Pittsburgh Penguins by scoring 14 goals in the final two games. However, in the second round the Bruins would by knocked off by the New York Islanders in five games. 

1980/81
:
Olympic hero Jim Craig is acquired from the Calgary Flames and impresses at first with a seven game unbeaten streak. However, the rest of the way he would be plagued by inconstancy as the Bruins finish in second place with a 37-30-13 record. However, in the playoffs Craig would play awful hockey as the Bruins are outscored 20-13 in a three game sweep.

1981/82
:
Led by Rick Middleton who scores 51 goals the Bruins finish in second place again with a solid 43-27-10 record. However in the Adams Division first Round the Bruins are beaten by the Buffalo Sabres in four games. 

1982/83:
The Bruins acquire goaltender Pete Peters, who wins the Vezina Trophy while posting a nine game winning streak and a 31-game undefeated streak with 26 wins, as the Bruins finish with a league best 50-20-10 record. In the playoffs the Bruins would oust the Quebec Nordiques in a four games. However in the Adams Division Finals the Bruins would be pushed to the limit by the Buffalo Sabres before winning Game 7 in overtime. However, in the Wales Conference Finals the Bruins would be sent away by the New York Islanders in six games.

1983/84
:
Ray Bourque becomes only the sixth defenseman in history to score 30 goals, as the Bruins win the Adams Division with a 49-25-6 record. However, in the playoffs he would be shut down as the Bruins score just two goals while being swept by the Montreal Canadiens in three straight games.

1984/85
:
The Bruins score more than 300 goals for the 15th consecutive season, but fall to fourth place with a 36-34-10 record. IN the playoffs the Bruins would be bounced by their nemesis the Montreal Canadiens again losing a 1-0 heartbreaker in Game 5.

1985/86: Injuries lead to assistant coach Mike Millbury returning to the ice for 22 games as the Bruins finish in third place with a 37-31-12 record. However, in the playoffs the Bruins would be swept in the first round by the Montreal Canadiens in three straight games.

1986/87
:
Ray Bourque wins the Norris Trophy as the league's best defenseman and scores his 600th career point, as the Bruins overcome early struggles and a coaching change to make the playoffs for the 20th season in a row with a 39-34-7 record. However, once again the Bruins would be swept by the Montreal Canadiens in the firs round this time in four games under the new format.

1987/88
:
In a classy move on December 3rd, Ray Bourque changes his number from 7 to 77, so that number 7 could be raised to the rafters for Phil Esposito. The Bruins would go on to finish in second place with a 44-30-6 record. In the playoffs the Bruins would get past the Buffalo Sabres in six games in the first round to set up another meeting with Montreal Canadiens in the Adams Division Finals. The Bruins would finally get the albatross off their neck in the Division Finals as they beat the Montreal Canadiens, for the first time in 45 years, in five games, winning four straight games after being blown out 5-2 in Game 1. In the Wales Finals the Bruins would hold off the pesky New Jersey Devils in 7 games. However in the Stanley Cup Finals the Bruins would be dominated by hey are doubled up by the Edmonton Oilers in the first three games.  In Game 4 trying to stave off elimination the Bruins and Oilers are tied 3-3 when an already foggy Boston Garden experience a power failure that ends the game. Two days later the Bruins would be doubled again losing 6-3 in Edmonton.

1988/89
:
When leading going into the third period, the Bruins are 29-1-0 on the season, as they finish in second place with a 37-29-14 record. In the first round the Bruins would have no trouble beating the Buffalo Sabres in five games. However, in the Adams Final the Bruins would fall to the Montreal Canadiens in five games.

1989/90
:
The Bruins allow the fewest goals in the league, and Ray Bourque wins the Norris Trophy as the Bruins win the Presidents Trophy with a 46-25-9 record. However, in the playoffs the Bruins would barely survive a seven game challenge form the Hartford Whalers in the first round. In the Adams Finals the Bruins would actually find things easier as they knocked off the Montreal Canadiens in five games. The Bruins would find things even easier in the Wales Final as they sweep the Washington Capitals in four straight games. However, in the Stanley Cup Finals the Bruins would drop Game 1 in a thrd overtime to the Edmonton Oilers and never recover losing the series in five games.

1990/91
:
It is another successful season for the Bruins as they win their Division again with a solid record of 44-24-12, as Ray Bourque wins the Norris Trophy again. In the playoffs the Bruins would sink the Hartford Whalers in six games before surviving a seven game war with the Montreal Canadiens to reach the Wales Conference Finals. However, the Bruins quest to get back to the Stanley Cup Finals in ended by the Pittsburgh Penguins in six games. Making the loss more painful is that Cam Neely suffers serve injury on a cheap shot from Penguins enforcer Ulf Samuelson.

1991/92:
Coming off his playoff injury Cam Neely plays just nine games as the Bruins are forced to acquire Adam Oates in the search for more offense. The deal would work out as the Bruins finished in second place with a 36-32-12 record. In the playoffs the Bruins would nearly blow a 3-1 series beating the Buffalo Sabres in seven games. In the Division Finals the Bruins would find things easier sweeping the Montreal Canadiens in four straight games. However, in the Wales Finals they would be swept themselves by the Pittsburgh Penguins.

1992/93
:
Injuries limit Cam Neely to 13 games, but the Bruins win the Adams Division by winning their last eight games to finish with a 51-26-7 record. However, in the first round the Bruins would be tripped up by the Buffalo Sabres as they are swept in four straight games, losing three games in overtime.

1993/94
:
Cam Neely is limited to 49 games but scores 50 goals in his first 44 games, as the Bruins finish in 2nd Place in the newly aligned Northeast Division. In the first round the Bruins would rally back after a deviating loss in Game 5 to beat the Montreal Canadiens in seven games. The Bruins would stay hot in the second round as they beat the Devils twice on the road in New Jersey. However, the Devils would return the favor in Boston, and would go on to win the series in six games.

1994/95
:
After a three month lockout the season is reduced to 48 games as the Bruins finish in third place with a 27-18-3 record, in the final year of hockey at the historic Boston Garden. However, the playoffs the Bruins would be knocked out quickly as they are beaten by the New Jersey Devils in five games, being shutout three times along the way.

1995/96
:
The Bruins open the season in their new home, the Fleet Center, with a 4-4 tie against the New York Islanders in which Cam Neely scores a hat trick. Neely would lead the team in goals with 26 as the Bruins finished in 2nd place with a 40-31-11 record. However, the Bruins would be stunned in the playoffs by the three year old Florida Panthers in five games. Following the season Neely who had been plagued with injures since the 1991 playoffs retires.

1996/97: The Bruins struggle all year to find someone to play goal trying six different goalies out as they finish in last place with a 26-47-9 record, missing the playoffs for the first tine in 30 years.

1997/98: In an off-season trade, the Bruins acquire forward Dmitri Khristich and goaltender Byron Dafoe from the Los Angeles Kings in exchange for Sandy Moger, Jozef Stumpel and a 1998 draft pick. Dafoe solves the Bruins problems in goaltending as the Bruins rebound to finish in second place with a 39-30-13 record. However, in the playoffs it would be a quick exit as they are tripped up by the Washington Capitals in six games.

1998/99
:
Byron Dafoe enjoys one of the best seasons ever by a Bruins goaltender, becoming just the fourth goaltender in team history to record ten shutouts in a season, as the Bruins finish in third place with a respectable 39-30-13 record. In the playoffs the Bruins would knock off the Carolina Hurricanes in six games, before falling to the Buffalo Sabres in six games themselves.

1999/00
:
It's the end of an era for the Bruins a they fall out of playoff contention, and deal Ray Bourque who for more then 20 years was the foundation of the team on defense to the Colorado Avalanche to give him a chance to win the Stanley Cup. The Bruins would go on to finish in last place with a 24-39-19-6 record.

2000/01
:
The Bruins get off to a slow start as Coach Pat Burns is replaced by Mike Keenan. As the season wore on the Bruins played better powered by the GAS line of Bill Guerin, Jason Allison, and Sergei Samsonov. However, despite finishing with a respectable 36-30-8-8 record, the Bruins would miss the playoffs while finishing in fourth place the Northeast Division. Following the season Keenan would be fired and replaced by Robbie Ftorek. In a side note Ray Bourque in his final season with the Colorado Avalanche would win the Stanley Cup.

2001/02
:
Jason Allison is traded to the Los Angeles Kings in exchange for a pair of former Bruins, Jozef Stumpel, who leads the team with 50 assists and Glen Murray, who goes on to lead the team in scoring with 71 points and ties Bill Guerin for the team lead in goals with 41. Stumpel's 50 assists are also a team high. Meanwhile Joe Thornton enjoys his finest season in the NHL with 68 points, despite missing nearly a month with a shoulder injury down the stretch. With the young up coming stars the Bruins would win the Northeast Division with a solid 43-24-6-9 record.  However, in the playoffs the Bruins would be stunned by the eighth seeded Montreal Canadiens in six games.

2002/03
:
After their disappointing playoff collapse the Bruins got off to a good start posting a 19-4-3-1 record through the first two months. However the void left in goal by the departure of Byron Dafoe would catch up to the Bruins who lost 14 of their next 18 games. The rest of the way the Bruins would play mediocre hockey as Coach Robbie Ftorek was fired and replaced by General Manager Mike O'Connell in March. Under O'Connell the Bruins would still make the playoffs with a record of 36-31-11-4. However in the playoffs the Bruins would be no match for the eventual Stanley Cup Champion New Jersey Devils who easily took the first three games before eliminating the Bruins in five games. 

2003/04
:
The Bruins got off to a strong start as Goalie Andrew Raycroft in his first full season in the NHL was unbeatable in the early going. Also providing a spark was 18-year old Patrice Bergeron the Bruins second round pick in the draft who led all rookies in scoring with 16 goals and 23 assists. With the new found youthfully core the Bruins would go on to win the Northeast Division with a solid record of 41-19-15-7, as Raycroft who finished the season with 29 wins and a 2.05 GAA edged Bergeron for the Calder Trophy. In the playoffs the Bruins got off to a flying start dominating the Montreal Canadiens on the way to grabbing a 3-1 series lead. However with a chance to close the series out at home in Game 5 the Bruins came up flat losing 5-1. The Bruins would also play poorly in Game 6 as the Habs battled back to force a seventh game. In Game 7 at the Fleet Center the Bruins dominated the ice for the first two periods. However, they could get nothing past Goalie Jose Theodore. Eventually the Habs would break the scoreless tie in the third period on the way to a 2-0 win, as the Bruins were eliminated in seven games.

2004/05: Season Cancelled Due to Lock Out

2005/06:
Coming out of the Lock Out the Bruins had high hopes as they were the defending Northeast Division Champions and were not hit hard by the new salary cap in fact they were able to add the veteran presence of Alexei Zhamnov and Brian Leetch. However, both would miss significant time due to injury as the Bruins got off to a sluggish start as they posted a mediocre 7-5-4 record through their first 16 games. However, things would go bad to worse as they lost 10 of 11 games in November, leading Bruins General Manager Mike O'Connell to conclude a shake up was needed so he traded Captain Joe Thornton to the San Jose Sharks for Marco Sturm, Brad Stuart and Wayne Primeau. The Bruins would win their first two games after the deal but it was obvious the deal was tremendous mistake as the Bruins never recovered and went on to spend the rest of the season in Last Place. Along the way Goalie Andrew Raycroft who won the Calder Trophy in 2004 was benched in favor of Tim Thomas, as fans openly called for the firing of O'Connell after the unpopular Thornton deal. As the lost season wound down O'Connell would indeed be fired as the Bruins finished with a terrible 29-37-16 record, while Thornton won the league scoring title and won the Hart Trophy for turning around the Sharks. Following the season the Bruins would change coaches as well as Mike Sullivan was replaced by Dave Lewis.

2006/07
:
The smoke was still settling after the Joe Thornton trade as the Bruins started the season with a new General Manager, and a new coach, with all signs pointing to a season of rebuilding. However, after getting off to a sluggish 4-7-1 start the Bruins would win 10 of their next 13 games as they got strong play from Rookie Phil Kessel. However, on December 11th the Rookie Center was diagnosed with Testicular Cancer. Fortunately it was caught early, and after having surgery doctors declared him to be cancer free, as he would miss just 11 games. Kessel would go on to win the Masterton Trophy for dedication to hockey as he scored 11 goals and 18 assists. However, things would not go as smoothly for the rest of the team, as a bad January dropped them below .500. as the playoffs were never in sight. Playing out the string the Bruins looked at times disinterested as they won just three of their last 17 games, finishing in last place again with a record of 35-41-6. Due in part to their poor finish the Bruins would change coaches again replacing Dave Lewis with Claude Julien following the season.

2007/08:
After two last place seasons, not much was expected out of the Bruins at the beginning of the season. However, in the early going they played well, winning five of their first seven games, on the way to an 18-11-3 record through mid-December. However, as six game losing streak would be a major setback heading into the New Year. The Bruins would rebound, with a solid 8-3-1 record in January thanks to the strong goaltending of Tim Thomas. This type of up and down play would become the hallmark of the Bruins in the second half as a five game winning streak would be balanced with a 2-5-4 stretch. Despite the inconsistency the Bruins would slip into the playoffs as the eight seed, with a record of 41-29-12. In the playoffs the Bruins would face an old familiar foe in the Montreal Canadiens. They were not given much of a chance to win the series, as they dropped the first two games on the road. As the series shifted to Boston, the Bruins managed to win Game 3 in overtime 2-1, as Marc Savard came off the bench on a delayed penalty to score with 9:25 gone in overtime. However, the Bruins still found themselves in a deep hole as they were shutout 1-0 in Game 4. Facing elimination the Bruins would score four times in the third period to keep their hopes alive with a 5-1 win in Game 5. The Bruins would score four the third again to send the series to a seventh game in a 5-4 in Game 6. However, the Bruins would be blanked in Game 7, as the Canadiens won to finale 5-0.

2008/09
:
After taking the Montreal Canadiens to a seventh game the Bruins looked to build into a more consistent team using a defense as their main weapon. Following a mediocre opening month, in which the Bruins posted a 5-3-3 record, the Bruins began to show they could be a force in the Eastern Conference as they lost just two games in regulation over a two month stretch. During this stretch the Bruins would record of 24-2-1. Leading the way for the Bruins charge was Goalie Tim Thomas, who had the best season of his career, with five shutouts and a .933 save percentage to go along with a solid 2.10 GAA to earn the Vezina Trophy. Meanwhile, Zdeno Chara, the Bruins 6'9" Captain had a monstrous season, with a career high 19 goals, winning the Norris Trophy. Powered by their strong stretch the Bruins would post the best record in the Eastern Conference at 53-19-10, as Claude Julien took home the Jack Adams Award. In the playoffs the Bruins would face the Montreal Canadiens again, with this time the Bruins being the favorites and the top seed. The series would be over fast, as the Bruins dominated the Habs in a four game sweep, in which they out-scored their rivals 17-4. Facing the Carolina Hurricanes in the second round the Bruins fully expected to continue on to the Conference Finals. However, the Bruins would hit a bump in the road losing three straight games after a solid 4-1 win in Game 1. Down three games to one, the Bruins would battle back as Tim Thomas recorded his first career playoff shutout as the Bruins won 4-0 in Game 5. Thomas would be strong again in Game 6, as the Bruins forced a seventh game with a 4-2 win on the road. Thomas would keep the Bruins in Game 7 back at the TD Garden, stopping 27 of 29 shots in regulation as they game went to overtime tied 2-2. However, the Hurricanes would end the Bruins season with a goal by Scott Walker 18:46 into the extra period.

2009/10
:
After their disappointing second round exit the Bruins made some roster changes, dealing Phil Kessel to the Toronto Maple Leafs and Chuck Kobasew to the Minnesota Wild. The retooled Bruins struggled early as they had trouble finding a scorer to replace Kessel. The Bruins also had trouble in goal as 2009 Vezina winner Tim Thomas suffered from nagging injuries all season. Fortunately for the Bruins Rookie Tuukka Rask came up and became a Calder Trophy candidate as the Bruins posted 20-12-7 record through the first three months. On New Year's Day the Bruins played in the shadow of the Green Monster as they hosted the Philadelphia Flyers at Fenway Park. Trailing 1-0 the Bruins got a power play goal from Mark Recchi with 2:18 left in regulation. In overtime it would be Marco Sturm who played the role of hero scoring at 1:57 to give the Bruins a 2-1 win. Following the Winter Classic the Bruins would go into a sudden tail spin, losing 14 of their next 16 games. Fortunately just before the Olympic Break the Bruins stopped their skid, and would head into the break with four straight wins. However, after the break the Bruins continued to play mediocre hockey in March as they were part of a four team scramble for the last three playoff spots in the Eastern Conference. In the next to last game of the season, the Bruins scored three shorthanded goals in 64 seconds to power their way to a 4-2 win over the Carolina Hurricanes. The win clinched the sixth seed as the Bruins posted a record of 39-30-13. In the playoffs the Bruins faced the Northeast Division Champion Buffalo Sabres, and earned a much needed split of the first two games on the road, as Zdeno Chara scored two goals in a 5-3 win in Game 2. As the series shifted to Boston, it was the goaltending of Tuukka Rask that led the way, as Patrice Bergeron scored the game winner midway through the third period. In Game 4 the Bruins trailed 2-0 at the start of the third period, but quickly tied the game on goals by David Krejci and Patrice Bergeron. They would go on to win the game in double overtime on a goal by Miroslav Satan. Despite a 4-1 loss in Game 5, the Bruins would win the series in six games, as David Krejci had two goals and an assist to lead the way. Facing the Philadelphia Flyers in the second round the Bruins got off to a fast start as Marc Savard returned from a concussion and scored the game winner in overtime of a 5-4 win. The Bruins would also win Game 2 and 3 to lead the series 3-0. The Bruins were one goal away from the Eastern Conference Finals as Marck Recchi tied Game 4 with 32 seconds left. However, in overtime the Flyers would earn a 5-4 win on a goal by Simon Gagne at 14:40. Back in Boston for Game 5, the Bruins came out flat as they lost 4-0. The Flyers would than even the series with a 2-1 win in Game 6 as the Bruins came within one minute of being shut out again. Suddenly in a Game 7, the Bruins appeared to get back on track as they jumped out to a 3-0 lead in the first period at TD Garden. However, the Flyers would get on the board late in the period on a goal by James van Riemsdyk in the second period the Flyers scored two more goals to tie the game 3-3. In the third period it was Simon Gagne again who doomed the Bruins with a power play goal at 12:52, as the Bruins became just the third team in NHL history to lose a series they once led 3-0. 

2010/11: After their disappointing playoff exit, the Bruins began the season with two games against the Phoenix Coyotes in Prague the capital of the Czech Republic. After losing the opener 5-2, the Bruins would earn a split of the two game match up as Tim Thomas earned a shutout in his first start of the season. After beating the New Jersey Devils and Washington Capitals on the road, the Bruins would beat the Capitals 4-1 in their home opener on October 21st. The Bruins would go on to finish October with a solid record of 6-2-0. November would prove tougher for the Bruins as they only managed a mediocre 6-6-2 record. The Bruins, would bounce back to have a strong month of December, as Tim Thomas regained the form that made him a Vezina Winner in 2009, as the Bruins entered the New Year with a record of 20-11-5. The Bruins continued to play well in January, as they posted a record of 8-4-2. On January 22nd the Bruins suffered bad news, as Marc Savard suffered another concussion during a 6-2 win on the road against the Colorado Avalanche. Savard would be forced to miss the rest of the season. To replace Savard, the Bruins picked up Chris Kelly from the Ottawa Senators for a second round draft pick and Tomas Kaberle in a trade from the Toronto Maple Leafs in exchange for prospect Joe Colborne. The mid February deals would help the Bruins right away, as they finished the month on a seven game winning streak that carried into March. However, March would see the Bruins go through some tough times, as they won just one of their next seven games. On March 8th, the Bruins were involved in some controversy as Max Pacioretty suffered head and neck injuries, when he was checked into the glass by a Zdeno Chara. The NHL would not suspend Chara, but fans in Montreal wanted blood, as the Habs won the game 4-1, demanding Chara be charged with assault. Despite the March struggles, the Bruins entered April in first place with a record of 43-23-11. The Bruins would win three of the last five games, and win the Northeast Division with a record of 46-2-11. The rivalry between the Bruins and Canadiens had never been as intense as the fight filled game in February, and the Chara incident in March. In the first round of the Stanley Cup Playoffs they would renew their rivalry. Things would get off to a bad start for the Bruins, as dropped the first two games at home, by a combined score of 5-1. In Game 2, they were forced to play without Zdeno Chara, who was hospitalized with dehydration. Chara would return to a chorus of boos in Montreal in Game 3, and it would be the boost the Bruins needed as they got back into the series with a 4-2 win. In Game 4, the Canadiens took an early 3-1 lead in the second period. The Bruins would battle back to tie the game before the second intermission. However, the Habs would take the lead back on a P.K. Subban power play goal. The Bruins would battle back again as Chris Kelly scored the equalizer with 6:18 left. With the game tied 4-4 in overtime, Michael Ryder would send the series back to Boston even at two games apiece with a goal just 1:59 into the extra session. Game 5 in Boston would go to double overtime, this time Nathan Horton would be the hero for the Bruins scoring at 9:03 to give the Bruins a 2-1 win. After a 2-1 loss in Montreal, the series would come down to a seventh game at TD Garden. Much like the series, Game 7 would be a tight battle as they game went to overtime tied 3-3. In overtime Nathan Horton would be the hero again, scoring at 5:43 to send the Bruins on to the second round. In beating the Canadiens, the Bruins became the first team to win a seven game series without a power play goal. In the second round the Bruins would be matched up against the Philadelphia Flyers again. Just like 2010, the Bruins got off to a quick start, winning the first three games, but this time there would be no collapse as the Bruins completed the sweep with a 5-1 win, outscoring the Flyers 20-7 along the way. In the Eastern Conference Finals the Bruins would face the Tampa Bay Lightning. After a 5-2 loss in Game 1, the Bruins turned to Rookie Tyler Seguin, who the Bruins got with the second overall pick acquired in the that sent Phil Kessel to the Toronto Maple Leafs, to give them a jump start as he had two goals and two assists in just his second playoff game to give the Bruins a 6-5 win. As the series shifted to Tampa, the Bruins relied heavily on Tim Thomas to earn a split, as stopped all 31 shots in a 2-0 win in Game 3. After a 5-3 loss in Game 4, the Bruins got another big start from Thomas in Game 5 who stopped 33 of 34 shots to give the Bruins a 3-1 win. Despite a hat trick from David Krejci the Lightning would force a seventh game with a 5-4 win. Game 7 in Boston, would be a battle of the goalies, as the game was scoreless after two periods. Finally with 7:33 left Nathan Horton would put the Bruins on the board. From there it was up to Tim Thomas, who stopped 24 shots to give the Bruins 1-0 win that sent them to the Stanley Cup Finals for the first time in 21 years.

2011 Stanley Cup Finals:
In the Finals the Bruins would face the Vancouver Canucks, and despite the Canucks high scoring stars, the series opener would be all about the goalies as neither Tim Thomas or Roberto Luongo showed any signs of let up. However, with just 18.5 seconds left in regulation the Canucks broke through for a 1-0 on a goal by Raffi Torres. Earlier in the game Alex Burrows had risen the ire of the Bruins by taking a bite out of Patrice Bergeron's finger. In Game 2, Burrows would annoy the Bruins again, by scoring an overtime winner just 11 seconds into the extra session to give the Canucks a 3-2 win. Down 2-0, the Bruins needed a jump start upon returning to Boston for Game 3. After a scoreless first period the Bruins came out smoking in the second period as Andrew Ference scored 11 seconds  into the period as the Bruins scored four goal to take a 4-0 lead. The Bruins would score another four goals in the third period for an 8-1 win. The Bruins continued to fly in Game 4, winning 4-0 to even the series, as Tim Thomas stopped all 38 shots. Back in Vancouver for Game 5, it would be another battle of the goalies that was scoreless after two periods. The Canucks would get on the board with a goal by Maxim Lapierre at 4:35 in the third period. The Canucks would go on to win the game 1-0 to take a 3-2 series lead. In Boston for Game 6, the Bruins got off to a fast start, scoring four goals in a 4:14 stretch in the first period chasing Roberto Luongo early. The Bruins would go on to win the game 5-2 sending the series to a decisive seventh game in Vancouver. In Game 7, the Bruins would strike first on a goal by Patrice Bergeron, as Tim Thomas stopped all eight shots in the first period. Thomas continued to frustrate the Canucks in the second period, stopping 13 shots as the Bruins scored twice on goals by Brad Marchand and Patrice Bergeron whose shorthanded goal seemed to suck the life out of the Canucks. Marchand would add an empty net goal in the final minutes as Thomas continued to be a brick wall stopping 16 shots as the Bruins won the Stanley Cup with a 4-0 victory. Tim Thomas was solid throughout the playoffs was rewarded with the Conn Smythe trophy as Playoff MVP.

2011/12
:
After winning their first Stanley Cup in 39 years, the Bruins began the season with the target on their back. In their season opener the Bruins banner raising party would be spoiled by the Philadelphia Flyers 2-1. It would signal a disappointing first month for the champs, as they ended October in last place with a record of 3-7-0, losing a home and home series to the hated Montreal Canadiens to end the month. However, as November began the Bruins would quickly be able to change the page looking like champions again, as they won ten straight games. Following a shootout loss against the Detroit Red Wings, the Bruins continued to roll as they got at least one point in each game during November, leaping back to the top of the Northeast Division, as Goalie Tim Thomas was 9-0. The Bruins would continue to play well in December, as they lost just three games, on the way to posting a record of 24-10-1 heading into 2012. The Bruins strong play continued into January, as they won four of their first five games, concluding a 30 game stretch where they posted a record of 25-4-1. However, in February injuries and an inconsistent power play would begin to take its toll in February as they lost Nathan Horton to a concussion and backup Goalie Tuukka Rask to a groin injury. At the trade deadline the Bruins would be busy, picking up Greg Zanon, Mike Mottau and one-time Bruin Brian Rolston, while signing Goalie Marty Turco to replace Rask. However, the Bruins continued to struggle in March as they went onto to finish with a record of 49-29-4, winning the Northeast Division as they survived a late charge from the Ottawa Senators. Leading the way was Patrice Bergeron who won the Selke as the best defensive forward, with 64 points and terrific +/- of +36. In his second season, Tyler Seguin was nearly as good with +34, while leading the team in scoring with 67 points, as Brad Marchand led the team with 28 goals.

2012 Playoffs:
Looking to repeat their Stanley Cup run as the second seed, the Bruins started the postseason against the Washington Capitals. Right from the start it was easy to tell the first round series would be a defensive struggle, as Game 1 went into overtime scoreless. The Bruins would win the opener 1-0 on a goal by Chris Kelly.  However, the Capitals would rebound to win Game 2 in double overtime 2-1. The teams were able to find more scoring in Game 3 in Washington, as Zdeno Chara led the way with a goal and two assists leading the way in a 4-3 win for the Bruins. However, the Capitals would rebound to win the next two games to put the Bruins on the brink of elimination, as Troy Brouwer stunned the Garden crowd with a goal with 87 seconds left in a Caps 4-3 win in Game 5. In Game 6 in Washington, the Bruins would show their championship mettle, winning in overtime 4-3 as Tyler Seguin had two goals, including the game winner. However, back in Boston, the Bruins who lived for Game 7 during their cup won, had their hopes of back-to-back titles dashed with a 2-1 loss in overtime, as Joel Ward beat Tim Thomas, to send the Capitals into the second round. 

2012/13:
Even before the lockout, Goalie Tim Thomas announced his plans to sit out the entire season. When the 48-game season began in January this meant that Tuukka Rask would finally get the Bruins net all to himself. Rask was nearly flawless in the early part of the schedule as the Bruins won five of their first six games. They continued their strong play into February as Rask established himself as one of the best goalies in the NHL, with a 2.00 GAA and five shutouts. After posting a record of 19-4-3 through their first 26 games the Bruins suddenly went into a goal scoring drought and struggled over the final six weeks of the regular season, losing their grip on first place in the Northeast Division. At the trade deadline, the Bruins attempted the acquire Jarome Iginla from the Calgary Flames. However, the Flames turned the tables on the Bruins and dealt their high scoring captain to the Pittsburgh Penguins instead. The Bruins would settle for Jaromir Jagr who despite being one of the oldest players in the league still had a strong scoring touch. The final week of the season would be marked with delays after two Russian-Islamic terrorist planted a bomb at the finish line of the Boston Marathon. The Bruins would have two games postponed, as they city was first shocked and then galvanized by the events as the Bruins finished the season with a record of 28-14-6.

2013 Playoffs: With the fourth seed the Bruins would face to Toronto Maple Leafs in the first round of the playoffs. After falling behind early in Game 1, the Bruins rallied with four unanswered goals to with the opener 4-1. The Leafs recovered to win 4-2 in Game 2, but the Bruins continued to control the series winning Game 3 in Toronto 5-2, with five different goal scorers. Powered by a David Krejci hat trick in Game 4, the Bruins would take a commanding 3-1 series lead with a 4-3 win in overtime. However, looking to close the series out the Bruins went into another scoring slump, losing 2-1 in their next two games as the series went to a seventh game. The Bruins looked to heading for another disappointing first round exit, as they trailed 4-1 midway through the third period at TD Garden. With just over ten minutes left, Nathan Horton breathe some life into the silent Garden with a goal, but as time ticked down fans began to hit the exits. Those fans that left early would miss one of the greatest comebacks in NHL history, as Milan Lucic and Patrice Bergeron scored in the final 90 seconds with an extra attacker on the ice. With the remaining fans roaring through intermission, the Bruins would win in overtime 5-4 on a goal by Bergeron at the 6:05 mark. In the second round the Bruins would face another old rival in the New York Rangers. Game 1 would go to overtime as Tuukkas Rask and Henrik Lundqvist turned the game into a battle of goalies. With less than five minutes left in the first 20 minute overtime period, Brad Marchand netted the game winner as the Bruins won 3-2. Rask was solid again in Game 2, stopping 35 of 37 shots as the Bruins pulled away late to win 5-2. As the series shifted to Madison Square Garden, Rask continued to frustrate the Rangers, stopping 23 of 24 shots as the Bruins got a 2-1 win with third period goals by Johnny Boychuk and Daniel Paille.  The Rangers would take Game 4 in overtime 4-3, but the series belonged to the Bruins as Tuukka Rask stopped 28 of 29 shots in a 3-1 win, that was clinched with Gregory Campbell's empty netter. At the trade deadline the Pittsburgh Penguins appeared to have built an unbeatable offensive team by acquiring Jarome Iginla, but the Bruins defense would find a way to shut down and confound the Penguins during the Eastern Conference Finals, winning 3-0 in the opener with Tuukka Rask recording a 29 save shutout. In Game 2 it was the Bruins offense that led the way with six different scorers in a 6-1 win. With the series shifting to Boston, the Bruins would smell blood in the water as they continued to shut down Sidney Crosby and Evegni Malkin. Rask would stop 53 of 54 shots, as Patrice Bergeron won the game 2-1 with a goal in double overtime. The Bruins would go on to complete the sweep with a 1-0 shutout win in Game 4, as the Penguins superstar scorers were held without a point in the series.

2013 Stanley Cup Finals
:
For the first time in 34 years two of the Original Six teams would meet in Stanley Cuo Finals as the Boston Bruins faced the Chicago Blackhawks. Right from the start the series had the feel of a classic, as the opener went into Triple Overtime. The Blackhawks would eventually win the game 4-3 as Andrew Shaw was credited with the goal off a double deflection from Michal Rozsival. Game 2 would also go to overtime as Daniel Paille scored the game winner to even the series for the Bruins 2-1. As the series shifted to Boston, the Bruins got a big game from Tuukka Rask, stopping all 28 shots to lead was in a 2-0 win. The offenses would come alive in Game 4, as the two teams traded the lead several times as the game was deadlocked 5-5 at the end of regulation. This time it would be the Blackhawks getting the 6- win on a goal by Brent Seabrook. The Blackhawks would regain control of the series with a 3-1 win in Game 5, as the series had all the markings of a seven game marathon. With Game 6 in Boston, it looked as if the Bruins were closing in on getting it to decisive seventh game as they held a 2-1 lead late in the third period. However, the Blackhawks would tie the game after putting on an extra attacker on a goal by Bryan Bickell with 1:16 left in regulation. The game would never reach overtime as the Bruins mishandled the faceoff with Dave Bolland scoring the cup clinching goal just 17 seconds later. The Blackhawks would win 3-2 as they skated around TD Garden's ice with the Stanley Cup.


Logo
2007-Present
90th Season
First Game Played December 1, 1924
 
 
 
 
 
Address:
TD Banknorth Garden, Suite 250
Boston, MA 02114
Phone: (617) 624-1900

Web:
http://www.bostonbruins.com

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Coaches: (34)
Art Ross 1924/25-1927/28
Cy Denneny 1928/29
Art Ross 1929/30-1933/34
Frank Patrick 1934/35-1935/36
Art Ross 1936/37-1938/39
Cooney Weiland 1939/40-1940/41
Art Ross 1941/42-1944/45
Dit Clapper 1945/46-1948/49
George Boucher 1949/50
Lynn Patrick 1950/51-1954/55
Milt Schmidt 1954/55-1960/61
Phil Watson 1961/62-1962/63
Milt Schmidt 1962/63-1965/66
Harry Sinden 1966/67-1969/70
Tom Johnson 1970/71-1972/73
Bep Guidolin 1972/73-1973/74
Don Cherry 1974/75-1978/79
Fred Creighton 1979/80
Harry Sinden 1979/80
Gerry Cheevers 1980/81-1984/85
Harry Sinden 1984/85
Butch Goring 1985/86-1986/87
Terry O'Reilly 1986/87-1988/89
Mike Mulberry 1989/90-1990/91
Rick Bowness 1991/92
Brian Sutter 1992/93-1994/95
Steve Kasper 1995/96-1996/97
Pat Burns 1997/98-2000/01
Mike Keenan 2000/01
Robbie Ftorek 2001/02-2002/03
Mike O'Connell 2002/03
Mike Sullivan 2003/04-2005/06
Dave Lewis 2006/07
Claude Julien 2007/08-Present
 
 
 
Arenas: (3)
Boston Arena 1924/25-1927/28
Boston Garden 1928/29-1994/95
TD Garden 1995/96-Pres.
*-Known as Fleet Center 1995-2004
 
Stanley Cup Champions: (6)
1929, 1939, 1941, 1970, 1972, 2011

Stanley Cup Finals
: (19)
1927, 1929, 1930, 1939, 1941, 1943, 1946, 1953, 1957, 1958,  1970, 1972, 1974, 1977, 1978, 1988, 1990, 2011, 2013

Confrence Finals
(since 1968): (15)
1969, 1970, 1972, 1974, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1983, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 2011, 2013

President's Trophy
: (2)
1990, 2014

Division Champions
: (28)
1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1933, 1935, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1971, 1972, 1974, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1983, 1984, 1990, 1991, 1993, 2002, 2004, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2014

Playoff Appearences
: (69)
1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1933, 1935, 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1998, 1999, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
 
 
Hall of Famers: (54)
Charles Adams Pres. 1924-1947
Weston  Adams  Pres. 36-51; 64-69
Marty Barry C 1929-1935
Bobby Bauer RW
35-42; 45-47; 51/52
Leo Bolvin D 1954-1966
Ray Borque D 1979-2000
Frank Brimsek G 1938-43; 1946-49
George Brown Owner 1928-1937
Walter A. Brown Pres. 1951-1964
John Bucyk LW 1957-1978
Billy Burch C 1932/33
Pat Burns Coach 1997-2001

Gerry Cheevers G 1965-72; 1975-80
Dit Clapper D 1927-1947
Sprague Cleghorn D 1925-1928
Paul Coffey D 2000/01

Roy Conacher LW  1938-42; 45/46
Fred Cook LW 1936/37
Bill Cowley C 1935-1947
Cy Denneny LW 1928/29
Woody Dumart LW 1935-42; 45-54
Phil Esposito C 1967-1976
Ferny Flaman D 1945-52; 1954-56
Frank Frederickson C 1926-1929
Busher Jackson LW 1941-1944
Tom Johnson D 1963-1965
Gordon Keats C 1926/27
Guy Lapointe D 1983/84
Brian Leetch D 2005/06
Harry Lumley G 1957-1960
Mickey MacKay C 1928-1930
Sylvio Mantha D 1936/37
Joe Mullen RW 1995/96

Cam Neely RW 1986-1996
Adam Oates C 1991-1997
Harry Oliver RW 1926-1934
Bobby Orr D 1966-1976
Bernie Parent G 1965-1967
Brad Park D 1975-1983
Jacques Plante G 1972/73
Babe Pratt D 1946/47

Bill Quackenbush D 1949-1956
Jean Ratelle C 1975-1981
Art Ross GM 1924-1954
Terry Sawchuk G 1955-1957
Milt Schmidt C 1936-42; 1946-55
Eddie Shore D 1926-1940
Babe Siebert D 1933-1936
Harry Sinden GM 1966-2001
Hooley Smith C 1936/37
Allan Stanley D 1956-1958
Nels Stewart C 1932-1935; 1936/37

Tiny Thompson G 1928-1939
Cooney Weiland C 1928-1939
 
 
 
Retired Numbers: (11)
  2 Eddie Shore D 1926-1940
  3 Lionel Hitchman D 1925-1934
  4 Bobby Orr D 1966-1976
  5 Dit Clapper D 1927-1947
  7 Phil Esposito C 1967-1976
  8 Cam Neely RW 1986-1996
  9 John Bucyk LW 1955-1978
15 Milt Schmidt C 1936-42; 1946-55
24 Terry O'Reilly RW 1971-1985
77 Ray Bourque D 1979-2000
99 Wayne Gretzky
(Retired by NHL)
 
 
©MMXIV Tank Productions. Stats researched by Frank Fleming, all information, and team names are property of the National Hockey League.  This site is not affiliated with the Boston Bruins or the NHL.  This site is maintained for research purposes only.
All logos used on this page were from
Chris Creamer's Sports Logos Page.
Page created on November 26, 2002. Last updated on July 18, 2014 at 7:00 pm ET.  

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Captains: (18)
No Captain 1924/25-1926/27
Lionel Hitchman 1927/28-1930/31
George Owen 1931/32
Dit Clapper 1932/33-1937/38
Cooney Weiland 1938/39
Dit Clapper 1939/40-1946/47
Jack Crawford 1946/47-1949/50
Milt Schmidt 1950/51-1953/54
Ed Sandford 1954/55
Ferny Flaman 1955/56-1960/61
Don McKenney 1961/62-1962/63
Leo Boivin 1963/64-1965/66
John Bucyk 1966/67
No Captain 1967/68-1972/73
John Bucyk 1973/74-1976/77
Wayne Cashman 1977/78-1982/83
Terry O'Reilly 1983/84-1984/85
Rick Middleton & Ray Bourque 1985-1988
Ray Bourque 1988/89-1999/2000
Jason Allison 2000/01
Joe Thornton 2001/02-2005/06
Zdeno Chara 2006/07-Present
 
 
 
All-Star Games Hosted: (2)
1971, 1996

All-Star Game MVP: (3)
1972 Bobby Orr D
1996 Ray Borque D
2001 Bill Geurin LW
 
 
Awards:
Jack Adams Award
(Top Coach): (3)
1976 Don Cherry
1998 Pat Burns
2009 Claude Julien

Calder Trophy
(Top Rookie): (8)
1939 Frankie Brimsek G
1950 Jack Gelineau G
1957 Larry Regan RW
1967 Bobby Orr D
1968 Derek Sanderson C
1980 Ray Borque D
1998 Sergei Samsanov LW
2004 Andrew Raycroft G

Masterton Trophy
(Dedication): (4)
1986 Charles Simmer RW
1990 Gord Kluzak D
1994 Cam Neely RW
2007 Phil Kessel C

Lady Byng 
(Gentlemanly Play): (8)
1940 Bobby Bauer RW
1941 Bobby Bauer RW
1947 Bobby Bauer RW
1960 Don McKenney C
1971 John Bucyk LW
1974 John Bucyk LW
1976 Jean Rattelle C
1982 Rick Middleton LW

Selke Trophy (Defensive Fwd): (3)
1982 Steve Kasper C
2012 Patrice Bregeron C
2014 Patrice Bregeron C

Norris Trophy (Defenseman): (14)
1968 Bobby Orr
1969 Bobby Orr
1970 Bobby Orr
1971 Bobby Orr
1972 Bobby Orr
1973 Bobby Orr
1974 Bobby Orr
1975 Bobby Orr
1987 Ray Bourque
1988 Ray Bourque
1990 Ray Bourque
1991 Ray Bourque
1994 Ray Bourque
2009 Zdeno Chara

Vezina Trophy
(Top Goalie): (10)
1930 Tiny Thompson
1933 Tiny Thompson
1936 Tiny Thompson
1938 Tiny Thompson
1939 Frankie Brimsek
1942 Frankie Brimsek
1983 Pete Peeters
2009 Tim Thomas
2011 Tim Thomas
2014 Tuukka Rask

Hart Trophy (NHL MVP): (12)
1933 Eddie Shore D
1935 Eddie Shore D
1936 Eddie Shore D
1938 Eddie Shore D
1941 Bill Cowley C
1943 Bill Cowley C
1951 Milt Schmidt C
1969 Phil Esposito C
1970 Bobby Orr D
1971 Bobby Orr D
1972 Bobby Orr D
1974 Phil Esposito C
 
 
 
Conn Smythe (Playoff MVP): (3)
1970 Bobby Orr D
1972 Bobby Orr D
2011 Tim Thomas G

 
 
Best Season:
1970/71 (57-14-7, 121 pts)

Worst Season:
1961/62 (15-47-8, 38 pts)
 
 
Minor League Afilliate:
Providence Bruins (AHL)
South Carolina Stingrays  (ECHL)
 
 
 
On The Air:
Televsion
:
NESN

Radio
:
WBZ (98.5 FM)

Broadcasters
:
Andy Brickley and Jack Edwards-TV; Bob Beers, and Dave Goucher-Radio

Foster Hewittt Award Winners
: (2)
Fred Cusick 1971-1997
Bob Wilson 1967/68, 1971-1994
Alternate Logo
2007-Present
Mascot:
Blades
 
 
 
Team Song:
Nutty
Mascot:
The Bear
Cheerleaders:
Bruins Ice Girls
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