Nickname:
Canadiens is French for Canadians in this team named after inhabitants of their country.

 
Coach:
Michel Therrien 2012/13-

Stadium
:
Bell Centre 1995/96-
 
Historical Moments:

1909/10: On December 4th, the Canadiens are founded by J. Ambrose O'Brien, a sportsman from Ottawa, with financial support from another magnate of the time, T.C. Hare. The latter providing the $1,000 required for the formation of a team as well as the $5,000 to guarantee the players' salaries. Playing in newly formed National Hockey Association, the Canadiens take the ice for the first time on January 5th beating the Cobalt Silver Kings 7-6 in overtime before 3,000 spectators at Jubilee Rink. There was not much success that year for the Canadiens as they finished with a woeful record of 2-10.

1910/11:
The Canadiens are sold to George Kennedy as the team's sweaters are changed from blue to red during an improved 8-8 season that season them finish 2nd in the NHA.

1911/12: The Canadiens finish in 4th place in the NHA with a record of 8-10.

1912/13
:
The Canadiens continue to play mediocre hockey as they finish in 5th place with a 9-11 record.

1913/14
:
The Canadiens post their first winning season finishing 2nd with a 13-7 record. However, with a chance to play for the Stanley Cup the drop a total goal series to the Toronto Blueshirts by a score of 6-2 losing Game 2 in Toronto 6-0 after winning Game 1 at home 2-0.

1914/15:
The Canadiens uniform begins to take on a familiar look with their red jerseys featuring a red C on a blue stripe makes it debut the only difference is an A is in the center of the C. However, the Canadiens struggle on the ice finishing with an awful 6-14 record.

1915/16:
The Canadiens rebound off a terrible season and finish in first place finishing with a solid 16-7-1 record. Representing the NHA the Canadiens faced the Portland Rosebuds from the PCHA with the Stanley Cup on the line. After the 2 teams split the first 4 games the Canadiens took the decisive 5th game when seldom used Goldie Prodgers found the back of the net in the 3rd period to give the Habs a 2-1 win for their first Stanley Cup. Players received $238 for winning the cup.

1916/17
:
After winning their first Stanley Cup the Canadiens jersey are changed again with an H replacing the A, as the Canadiens, establishing a look that would become one of the most familiar insignia in the world of sports. After winning the first half championship the Canadiens struggle in the 2nd half finishing with an overall 10-10 record, but making the playoffs. In the NHA final the Canadiens would beat the Ottawa Senators 7-5 in a 2-game total goal series. However with the Stanley Cup on the line the Canadiens are stunned by the Seattle Metropolitans of the PCHA in 4 games. After winning Game 1, by a score of 8-4 the Habs would be thrashed in the final 3 games by a combined score of 19-3 as an American team claims the Cup for the first time.

1917/18:
Stemming partly from hatred of Toronto Blueshirts owner Eddie Livingstone, the owners of the NHA's teams decide to form a new league known as the National Hockey League leaving LIvingstone behind. Sharing the Montreal Arena with Wanderers the Canadiens win the first ever NHL game 7-4 as Joe Malone scored 5 goals including the first goal in NHL history. The Canadiens would go on to finish in a first place tie with a 13-9 record, as Joe Malone scores 44 goals in 22 games establishing a season record that would last 27 years. Establishing an NHL first was goalie Georges Vezina who recorded the NHL's first shutout over the Toronto Arenas 9-0 on February 18th. The season was not without its difficult moments as the Habs were forced to return to Jubilee Rink after the Montreal Arena burned down.   However, the Habs would drop their playoff against the Toronto Arena with NHL title on the line.

1918/19
:
In their 2nd NHL season the Canadiens finish in 2nd place with a 10-8 record. In the NHL Finals the Canadiens would earn the right to represent the league with Stanley Cup on the line by beating the Ottawa Senators in a Total Goal Series. In a rematch of the 1917 final the Canadiens faced the Seattle Metropolitans in a series using both Western 6-man and Eastern 5-man rules played in Seattle. After the Mets took Games 1 and 3 under Western rules, the Canadiens need to win Game 4 just to stay alive in the series. However, Game 4 would never be decided as neither team could score. As Game 5 was played the influenza epidemic in the Seattle are began to become a concern as several players off each team became seriously sick. The Habs would force a decisive 6th game after winning Game 5 in OT 4-3. However, the influenza outbreak would get worse, and the rest of the series was cancelled. The epidemic would hit home for the Canadiens when defenseman Joe Hall succumbed on April 5th.

1919/20
:
The Canadiens are touched by fire again as Jubilee Rink is lost in a summer fire. This forced officials to scramble and build a new rink between Clarke and Saint-Urbain Streets called Mount Royal Arena which was built for $300,000 in less then 6 months, housing 10,000 seats. In their first game at their new arena the Canadiens beat the Toronto St. Patricks 14-7, as Newsy Lalonde scored a record 6 goals. However, the Canadiens would fall short in their attempt to return to the playoffs as they finished in 2nd place with a 13-11 record.

1920/21: The Canadiens fall just short of the playoffs again, finishing in 3rd place with a 13-11 record.

1921/22
:
Tragedy strikes the Canadiens as their owner George Kennedy passes away. Shortly after his passing Kennedy's widow sells the team to Leo Dandurand, Jos Cattarinich & Louis A Letourneau for $11,500. Under new ownership the Canadiens would be on the outside looking in again finishing in 3rd place with a 12-11-1 record.

1922/23
:
The Canadiens are involved in a tight battle all season for first place finishing 1 point short with a 13-9-2 record. With a second chance in the playoffs the Canadiens would be beaten out by the Ottawa Senators in a Total Goal Series.

1923/24:
The Canadiens finish the season in 2nd place again with a 13-11 record. However, in the NHL playoffs the Canadiens would win the right to fight for the Stanley Cup by beating the Ottawa Senators in a Total Goal series. In the finals the Canadiens beat both the Vancouver Millionaire sand Calgary Tigers in 2 straight to claim their 2nd Stanley Cup. The star of the first series against Vancouver was Billy Boucher who scored 3 of the Habs 5 goals including both game winners. While 21-year old rookie Howie Morenz notched Hat Trick in both games against Calgary.

1924/25
:
Due to problems with the ice at the Mount Royal Arena the Canadiens are forced to open their season in the rival Maroons new home known as the Montreal Forum. In the first game ever at the Forum the Habs beat the Toronto St. Patricks 7-1 scoring the first goal is Billy Boucher. The Habs would return to their home and would go on to finish in 3rd place with a 17-11-2 record. Facing the St. Patricks in the semifinal the Canadiens would win easily to advance to the NHL final. However, the final would be canceled, as the Hamilton Tigers did not make payment to their players, forcing 10 players to quit the team, as the Canadiens were awarded the NHL Championship. Facing the Victoria Cougars in the Stanley Cup Finals the Canadiens fumble the NHL's stranglehold on the Stanley Cup falling in 4 games. It would be the last time a non-NHL team won hockey's Holy Grail.

1925/26:
During an early season game on November 28th legendary goalie George Vezina collapses after the first period due to a high fever. In his 16th season with Habs, Vezina would never play again, being diagnosed with tuberculosis. Without their star backstop the Canadiens would fall into last place with an 11-24-1 record. Shortly after the season ended Vezina would succumb at the age of 39. Following his passing the NHL would name a yearly award for the best goaltender in his honor.

1926/27:
Now playing in the Montreal Forum fulltime the Canadiens would rebound from their season of loss to finish in 2nd place in the Canadian Division with a 28-14-2 record as George Hainsworth captures the first Vezina Trophy. In the playoffs the Habs would battle their English speaking rivals the Montreal Maroons, beating them in overtime of Game 2 to capture their total goal series 2-1. However, in the semifinals the Canadiens would be beaten 5-1 in a Total Goal series by the Ottawa Senators.

1927/28
:
Led by Howie Morenz who wins the Hart Trophy with a league best 51 points the Canadiens finish the season with the best record in the NHL at 26-11-7. However in the semifinals the Habs would be stunned by the Maroons in overtime of Game 2, losing their total goal series by a score of 3-2.

1928/29
:
George Hainsworth sets an NHL record by recording 22 shutouts on the way to his 3rd straight Vezina Trophy as the Canadiens again finish with the best record in the NHL at 22-7-15. However, the Canadiens would be shutout themselves in playoffs, as they are swept by the Boston Bruins in 3 straight losing the first 2 games 1-0.

1929/30
:
The Canadiens finish the season in 2nd place with a record of 21-14-9, losing a tight race with the rival Maroons. In the playoffs the Canadiens would beat the Chicago Blackhawks in a Total Goal Series before sweeping the New York Rangers in 2 straight to earn a trip to the finals. Facing the Boston Bruins who posted an impressive 38-5-1 record in the regular season the Canadiens pull off the upset beating the Bruins in 2 straight to win their 3rd Stanley Cup, staring for the Habs in the Finals in Sylvio Mantha who tallies key goals in both games.

1930/31:
The Canadiens win their 3rd division in 4 years by finishing with a 26-10-8 record. Facing the Boston Bruins in the semifinals the Canadiens win a hard fought 5-game series taking the decisive 5th game in overtime by a score of 3-2. In the Finals the Canadiens would overcome 2 overtime losses by winning Games 4 and 5 to take their 2nd straight Stanley Cup against the Chicago Blackhawks.

1931/32
:
Seeking their 3rd straight Stanley Cup Championship the Canadiens finish with the best record in the NHL at 25-16-7 as Howie Mornez wins his 3rd Hart Trophy. However, the Canadiens quest for the cup would come to a sudden end in the semifinals losing 3 straight to the New York Rangers after capturing Game 1.

1932/33
:
Despite struggling to finish in 3rd place with an 18-25-5 record the Canadiens still make the playoffs. However in a Total Goal Series in the first round the Habs are thrashed 8-5 by the New York Rangers.

1933/34:
The Canadiens continue to be a perennial playoff contender by finishing in 2nd place with a 22-20-6 record. However, for the second year in a row the Habs are bounced out quickly losing to the Chicago Blackhawks in a Total Goal Series by a score of 4-3.

1934/35
:
Despite a disappointing 19-23-6 the Canadiens still make the playoffs by finishing in 3rd place in the Canadian Division. However for the 3rd year in a row the Canadiens are bounced in the first round losing to the New York Rangers in a Total Goal Series 5-4.

1935/36
:
The Canadiens streak of 10 straight playoff appearances comes to an end as they finish with a league worse 11-26-11 record.

1936/37
:
Tragedy strikes the Canadiens again as star center Howie Morenz dies of complications from a broken leg suffered against the Chicago Blackhawks on January 28th. Despite the tragedy the Canadiens would finish in first place with a 24-18-6 record. However in the playoffs the Canadiens would lose a 5-game series in heartbreaking fashion losing Game 5 to the Detroit Red Wings in overtime by a score of 2-1.

1937/38
:
Prior to the start of the season the Canadiens and Maroons play a benefit all-star game against the rest of the NHL for Howie Morenz's family. The season would mark the last time the Canadiens would have to share the Forum as the Maroons folded following the season. After an 18-17-13 record the Canadiens lose in a first round series to the Chicago Blackhawks dropping the decisive3rd game in overtime by a score of 3-2.

1938/39:
Despite an awful 15-24-9 record the Canadiens still make the playoffs by avoiding last place in the now 7-team NHL. In the playoffs the Canadiens would fall again in the first round losing a decisive 3rd game in overtime 1-0 to the Detroit Red Wings.

1939/40
:
The Canadiens hit rock bottom finishing in last place with a franchise worse 10-33-5 record.

1940/41
:
The Canadiens continue to struggle but make the playoffs by finishing in 6th place with a 16-26-6 record. In the playoffs the Habs would be bounced in the first round again losing to the Chicago Blackhawks in 3 games.

1941/42:
The Canadiens sneak into the playoffs again finishing in 6th place with an 18-27-3 record. In the playoffs again the Canadiens would be bounced in the first round again losing to the Detroit Red Wings in 3 games.

1942/43
:
With the league reduced to 6 teams the Canadiens have to finish in 4th place to qualify for the NHL's final playoff spot for the 4th time in 5 years with a 19-19-12 record, holding off the Chicago Blackhawks by 1 point. In the playoffs the Canadiens would be bounced quickly again losing top the Boston Bruins 4 games to 1.

1943/44
:
After struggling with mediocrity for the better part of a decade the Canadiens reestablish themselves as one of the NHL's elite teams by crushing the rest of the competition on the way to an impressive league best 38-5-78 record. In the playoffs the Habs stayed red-hot blowing away the Toronto Maple Leafs in 5 games outscoring them over the final 4 games by a score of 22-3. In the Finals the Canadiens would sweep away the Chicago Blackhawks in 4 straight as Maurice Richard netted 5 goals including a Game 2 Hat trick. In the Game 4 finale the Habs won in sudden death overtime on Toe Blake's goal. Helping to keep the game tied was Vezina winning goalie Bill Durnan who stopped the first penalty shot in Finals history.

1944/45:
The Canadiens looked like a strong bet for repeating as Stanley Cup Champions as they finished as regular season Champions again with a 38-8-4 record, as Maurice Richard becomes the first player to score 50 goals in a single season, netting the mark in a 50-game season. However, in the playoffs the Habs would be stunned in 6 games by the Toronto Maple Leafs.

1945/46
:
The Canadiens capture their 3rd straight regular season title with a 28-17-5 record. In the playoffs the Canadiens would catch fire outscoring the Chicago Blackhawks 26-7 in a 4-game sweep. In the Finals the Canadiens would get off to a fast start winning the first 2 games on the Boston Bruins in overtime, on the way to a 3-0 series lead. After dropping Game 4 in overtime, the Habs would put the Bruins with a 6-3 win in Game 5 for their 6th Stanley Cup Championship.

1946/47
:
With Goalie Bill Durnan winning his 4th straight Vezina Trophy the Canadiens finish in first place again with a 34-16-10 record. In the playoffs the Canadiens would blast the Boston Bruins in 5 games for the 3rd Final Appearance in 4 years. However, in the finals the Habs Stanley Cup reign would come to an end as they are beaten by the Toronto Maple Leafs in 6 games.

1947/48
:
With Toe Blake suffering a career ending leg injury the Canadiens endure a season of injuries missing the playoffs by finishing in 5th place with a 20-29-11 record.

1948/49
:
The Canadiens rebound off their injury plagued season to finish in 3rd place with a 28-23-9 record, as Bill Durnan wins his 5th Vezina Trophy in 6 years. However, in the playoffs the Canadiens would lose a hard fought 7-game battle to the Detroit Red Wings.

1949/50
:
The Canadiens finish in 2nd place with a solid 29-22-19 record playing in the Montreal Forum, which underwent a $600,000 renovation to expand capacity to 13,551 seats. Playing in his final season Goalie Bill Durnan wins his 6th Vezina Trophy. The playoffs would end quickly for the Habs as they are tripped up by the New York Rangers in 5 games. 

1950/51:
Despite a mediocre 25-30-15 record the Canadiens make the playoffs by finishing in 3rd place. In the playoffs the Canadiens would play their best hockey of the season knocking off the Detroit Red Wings in 6 games for a trip to the finals. The finals would be unforgettable battle against the Toronto Maple Leafs as all 5 games went to overtime. However, the Maple Leafs would emerge victorious in 4 of the games to claim the Stanley Cup.

1951/52:
The Canadiens put together a solid season finishing in 2nd place with a 34-26-10 record. In the playoffs the Canadiens would rally forcing Game 7 with a 3-2 win in overtime of Game 6. Building off the momentum the Habs would capture Game 7 by a score 3-1 to advance to their 2nd straight Final. However, in the finals the Canadiens are swept away by the Detroit Red Wings losing all 4 games by a combined score of 11-2.

1952/53
:
With Jacques Plante making his NHL debut the Canadiens finish in 2nd place with a record of 28-23-19. In the playoffs the Canadiens would overcome a devastating home loss in Game 5, to beat the Chicago Blackhawks in 7 games for their 2nd straight trip to the finals. After splitting the first 2 games of the finals with the Boston Bruins, Coach Dick Irvin replaces Plante in goal with backup Gerry McNeil. McNeil would make Irvin look like a genius, as he shutout the Bruins twice in the finals 3 games as the Canadiens won their 7th Stanley Cup with a  5 game series victory. Netting the cup-winning goal was Elmer Lach who broke a scoreless tie 1:22 into overtime.

1953/54
:
The Canadiens finish in 2nd place again posting a solid 35-24-14 record, as Jean Beliveau plays in his first full season. In the playoffs the Canadiens would breeze through the semifinals sweeping the Boston Bruins in 4 straight with a combined score of 16-4. In the finals the Habs overcame a 3-1 deficit to force a decisive 7th game. However the Habs dreams or repeating was ended by a 2-1 loss in overtime.

1954/55
:
Battling the Detroit Red Wings again for first place the Canadiens playoff chances take a blow when star Winger Maurice Richard is suspended for the playoffs after striking an NHL linesman. After Richard's suspension was announced the city of Montreal was thrown in to a destructive riot, as fans protesting the ruling got unruly. Without Richard in the final 2 games the Habs settle for 2nd place with a 41-18-11 record. In the semifinals the Habs did not seemed to miss the Rocket that much as they knocked off the Boston Bruins in 5 games. However, in the finals the absence of Richard caught up to them as they fell to the Detroit Red Wings in a hard fought 7-game series.

1955/56
:
With Toe Blake taking over the coaching reigns the Canadiens put together their first 100-point season finishing in first place with a 45-15-10 record, as Jacques Plante wins his first Vezina Trophy. In the playoffs the Hobs would turn it up a notch easily beating the New York Rangers in 5 games for their 6th straight Finals appearance. The Finals would end up becoming the Jean Beliveau show as the Canadiens star center scored 7 times as the Canadiens finally solved the Detroit Red Wings in 5 games. It was the Canadiens 8th Stanley Cup as they passed the Toronto Maple Leafs for most sips from Lord Stanley's Holy Grail.

1956/57:
Coming off their Stanley Cup Championship the Canadiens finish in 2nd place with a solid 35-23-12 record. In the playoffs the Canadiens remained a super power beating the New York Rangers in 5 games. Facing the Boston Bruins in the finals the Canadiens received a boost right away as Maurice Richard netted 4 goals in Game 1, as the Habs jumped out to a 3-0 series lead. After being shutout in Game 4 the Canadiens buried the Bruins with a 5-1 in Game 5 for their 2nd straight Stanley Cup Championship.

1957/58
:
The Canadiens seeking their 3rdd straight Stanley Cup the Canadiens capture the regular season championship with a record of 43-17-10. In the playoffs the Habs remained hot as they swept the Detroit Red Wings in 4 games. Moving on to their 8th straight Finals appearance the Canadiens led by Maurice Richard win their 3rd straight Stanley Cup by beating the Boston Bruins in 6 games.

1958/59
:
The Canadiens remain the class of the NHL winning the regular season championship again with a record of 39-18-13. In the playoffs the Habs work past a stiff challenge to beat the Chicago Blackhawks in 6 games for their 9th finals appearance in a row. In the finals the Canadiens would win their 4th straight Stanley Cup despite Maurice Richard being held scoreless as they beat the Toronto Maple Leafs in 5 games.

1959/60:
After breaking his nose Jacques Plante becomes the first goalie to wear a facemask in an NHL game on November 1st. With the mask in hand Plante would go on to win his 5th straight Vezina Trophy as the Canadiens finished with a league best 40-18-2 record. The Canadiens would sweep through the Chicago Blackhawks and Toto Maple Leafs on the way to their record 5th straight Stanley Cup. In the Finals Plante allowed just 5 goals in 4 games as Maurice Richard ended his career by netting his recorded 34th finals goal.

1960/61
:
With Boom Boom Geoffrion winning the Hart trophy by scoring 50 goals the Canadiens overcome the retirement of Maurice Richard by finishing with a league best 41-19-10. However, in the playoffs the Habs would be stunned in 6 games by the Chicago Blackhawks as their reign of % Stanley Cups and 10 Finals appearances comes to an end.

1961/62:
The Canadiens continue to be the top team in the league winning the regular season championship with a record of 42-14-14. However, for the second straight season the Habs season is ended in the semifinals by the Chicago Blackhawks in 6 games.

1962/63
:
The Canadiens string of 5 straight regular season championships comes to an end as they finish in 3rd place with a record of 28-19-23. However, in the semifinals the Canadiens lose tough 7-game series to the Toronto Maple Leafs scoring just 1 goal in the final 2 games.

1963/64:
The Canadiens recapture the regular season championship edging the Chicago Blackhawks by 1 point with a record of 36-21-13. However, in the playoffs the Habs are beaten in the semifinals by the Toronto Maple Leafs in 5 games.

1964/65
:
The Canadiens make the playoffs for the 23rd time in 24 years including15 straight years by finishing in 2nd place with a 36-23-11 record. In the playoffs the Habs would end the Toronto Maple Leafs reign of 3 straight Stanley Cups by beating them in 6 games of the semifinals. Moving on to the Finals the Habs would knock off the Chicago Blackhawks in 7 games as the home team won every game. Staring for the Canadiens who won their 13th Stanley Cup was Goalie Gump Worsley who recorded 2 shutouts and Jean Beliveau who won the first ever Conn Smythe Trophy for playoff MVP.

1965/66
:
The Canadiens dominate the NHL again winning the regular season championship with a 41-21-8 record. In the playoffs the Canadiens would make the Finals again by sweeping away the Toronto Maple Leafs. In the Finals the Canadiens would drop the first 2 games at home to Detroit Red Wings before rebounding to win 4 straight for their 2nd straight Stanley Cup Championship. Netting the cup-clinching goal was Henri Richard who beat Conn Smythe Winner Roger Crozier in overtime of Game 6.

1966/67
:
In the final season before expansion the Canadiens make the playoffs again by finishing in 2nd place with a 32-25-13 record. After sweeping the New York Rangers in the semifinals the Canadiens are beaten by a veteran Toronto Maple Leafs team in 6 games.

1967/68
:
The era of expansion arrives for the NHL but the Montreal Canadiens remain at the top of the heap winning the Eastern Division with a league best 42-22-10 record. In the playoffs the Canadiens get past the first round easily sweeping the Boston Bruins in 4 straight. Moving on to the Eastern Conference Finals the Habs stayed hot beating the Chicago Blackhawks in 5 games. Moving on to the finals the Canadiens played the expansion St. Louis Blues in the Stanley Cup Finals. The Blues had a roster of proven Stanley Cup competitors including former Hab Doug Harvey. Although the Canadiens would win their 15th Stanley Cup in a sweep all 4 games were decided by 1 goal including 2 in overtime. Following the playoffs Coach Toe Blake who won 9 Stanley Cups since taking over the reigns as coach retired after 13 years behind the Habs bench.

1968/69
:
The Montreal Forum is rededicated as he led arena completes massive renovations coasting $9.5 million that added seats improved sight lines, and modernized the whole arena. Under new coach Claude Ruel the Habs had a mod look too finishing with best record overall again at 46-19-11. In the playoffs the Canadiens remained hot sweeping the New York Rangers in 4 straight. In the Eastern Conference Finals the Habs used 3-overtime wins to catapult them over the Boston Bruins in 6 games. In the Finals the Canadiens would sweep the St. Louis Blue for the 2nd year in a row outscoring them 12-3 as Serge Savard won the Conn Smythe Award.

1969/70: Despite posting a 38-22-16 record that was 6 points better then the 1st place team in the Western Conference full of 3rd year teams the Canadiens miss the playoffs by finishing in 5th place with all the established teams. It is the first time the Habs miss the playoffs in 22 years and just the 2nd time in 29.

1970/71:
After missing the playoffs the Canadiens would get off to a slow start as Coach Claude Ruel resigns as is replaced by Al MacNeil. Under Mac Neil the Habs would play much better and would finish in 3rd place with a solid 42-23-13 record. Heading into the playoffs the Canadiens would make a change in net starting Ken Dryden despite only 6 regular season starts. Despite a shaky start Dryden hung tough in the first round as the Canadiens overcame a 302 deficit to dethrone the defending Champion Boston Bruins in 7 games. In the semifinals the Dryden started to get comfortable as the Habs beat the Minnesota North Stars in 6 games. Moving on to the Finals the Habs found themselves with their backs to the wall again trailing the Chicago Blackhawks 3 games to 2. Fuelled by the Mahovlich brothers Frank and Peter the Canadiens forced a 7th game in Chicago. Once again things looked bleak for the Habs in Game 7 as they fell behind 2-0. However, the Habs would rally as Henri Richard scored the tying and winning goals as the Canadiens won their 17th Stanley Cup. Ken Dryden who had an impressive playoff GAA of 3.00 was named Conn Smythe winner. Following the season Jean Beliveau would announce his retirement to take a job in the front office. Despite their Stanley Cup victory Coach Al MacNeil would not be kept on as the Canadiens named Scotty Bowman their new coach.

1971/72: Guy LaFleur becomes an instant fan favorite in his rookie season as the Canadiens finish in 3rd place with a solid 46-16-16 record. However, in the playoffs the Habs would lose in the first round to the New York Rangers in 6 games.

1972/73
:
The Canadiens dominate the NHL all season losing just 10 games on the way to an NHL best 120 points with a 52-10-16 record, as Ken Dryden continues a Canadiens tradition by becoming the 6th different Canadiens goalie to win the Vezina, and the 19th overall. In the playoffs the Habs started quickly taking a 3-0 series lead over the Buffalo Sabres before advancing in 6 games. In the semifinals The Canadiens overcame a heartbreaking Game 1 loss in overtime to beat the Philadelphia Flyers in 5 games. In the finals the Canadiens could not be stopped as they won their 18th Stanley Cup by beating the Chicago Blackhawks in 6 games, as Yvan Cournoyer won the Conn Smythe by setting a record with 15 goals in the playoffs.

1973/74
:
The Canadiens are hurt by a season long hold out by Ken Dryden, falling to 2nd Place with a 45-24-9 record. However, they would not feel the full effect until the playoffs when they are beaten by the New York Rangers in 6 games.

1974/75: Ken Dryden returns as the Canadiens win the newly established Norris Division with an impressive 47-14-19 record. After earning a first round by the Canadiens take out the Vancouver Canucks in 5 games to advance to the Wales Conference Finals. However in the Wales Final the Habs would fall in 6 games to the Buffalo Sabres, as Henri Richard's career came to an end.

1975/76
:
The Canadiens rip through the NHL regular season finishing with best overall record and incredible 127 points with a 58-11-11 record. After a first round bye the Canadiens continued to dominate sweeping the Chicago Blackhawks in 4 straight. Moving on to the Wales Final the Habs won their first 3 games on the way to dispatching the New York Islanders in 5 games. In the Finals the Canadiens continued their dominant ways sweeping the Philadelphia Flyers in 4 straight. Despite the Habs dominance no one player could be singled out for the Conn Smythe as Flyers Reggie Leach took home the award.

1976/77
:
The Canadiens set new records in dominance as Steve Shutt scored 60 goals setting a record for Left Wingers. Helping to set Shutt up is Guy LaFleur who wins the Hart Trophy by amassing 1936 points a new franchise record. Along with LaFleur the Goalie combo of Ken Dryden and Bunny Larocque won the Vezina, as Larry Robinson took home the Norris during an incredible all-time NHL best record of 60-8-12 with an incredible 132 points. In the playoffs the Canadiens crushed the St. Louis Blues in 4 straights outscoring them 19-3 to advance to the Wales Final. In the Wales Final the Canadiens would fight off a challenge form the New York Islanders in 6 games. In the finals the Habs would easily beat the Boston Bruins in 4 straight as Guy LaFleur was named Conn Smythe. The victory gave the Canadiens their 2nd straight Stanley Cup Championship and their 20th overall, 7 more then the 2nd best.

1977/78
:
The Canadiens dominance continues as the only fall off slightly from their record setting year taking the best record again at 59-10-11, with 127 points. In the playoffs the Canadiens would continue to be untouchable as they clipped the Detroit Red Wings in 5 games.  Moving n to the Semi-Finals the Habs would sweep away the Toronto Maple Leafs in 4 straight outscoring them 16-6. In the Finals the Habs would suffer 2 straight losses as the Boston Bruins evened the series 2 games apiece. However, there would be no denying the Habs their 3rd straight Stanley Cup as the won the next 2 games by identical 4-1 scores as star defenseman Larry Robinson won the Conn Smythe trophy by setting up 17 Canadiens goals.

1978/79
:
The Canadiens continue to be one of the top team in the NHL winning the Norris Division with a solid 52-17-11 record. In the playoffs the Canadiens would be quickly mulch up the Toronto Maple Leafs in 4 games. Moving on to the Semi-Finals the Canadiens would be challenged for the first time in 4 years as they were pushed to a 7th game by the Boston Bruins. In Game 7 the Habs would advance to the finals with win a 5-4 win n overtime. In the finals the Canadiens would fall behind early losing Game 1 to the New York Rangers 4-1. However the Habs quickly grabbed back momentum with a 6-2 win in Game 2 on the way to winning their 4th straight Stanley Cup in 5 games. Bob Gainey the league's premier 2-way forward would earn the Conn Smythe award. Following the season the Ken Dryden, Jacques Lemaire and Yvan Cournoyer all announce their retirements, as Scotty Bowman resigns as head coach.

1979/80:
Despite the retirement of several key players the Canadiens still won the Norris Division while amassing 107 points with a 47-20-13 record. In the playoffs the Canadiens would easily beat the Hartford Whalers sweeping them in 3 straight. However their reign would come to an end in the 2nd round as they are stunned by the Minnesota North Stars in 7 games.

1980/81: The Canadiens win their 7th straight Division title with a 45-22-13 record. However in the first round they would be stunned by an up and coming Edmonton Oilers team led by Wayne Gretzky who swept them in 3 straight.

1981/82
:
With realignment the Canadiens are shifted to the Adams Division once again finishing in first place with a solid 46-17-17 record. In the Adams Division Playoffs the Habs would face the Provincial Rival the Quebec Nordiques. In battle of David versus goliath the Nordiques would stun the Habs with a dramatic 3-2 win overtime of Game 5.

1982/83
:
The Canadiens string of 8 straight Division titles comes to an end as they settle for 2nd place with a 42-24-14 record. In the playoffs the Habs would be sent home early as they are swept by the Buffalo Sabres in 3 straight.

1983/84
:
Despite suffering their first losing season in 33 years the Canadiens still make the playoffs by finishing in 4th place with a 35-40-5 record. However, in the playoffs the Canadiens would play their best hockey of the season as they swept the 1st place Boston Bruins in 3 straight outscoring the 10-2. Moving on to the Adams Division Finals the Habs would stay hot as they beat the Quebec Nordiques in 6 games. In the Wales Conference Finals the Habs would continue to roll as they took the first 2 games against the New York Islanders. However, the Canadiens run would stall as they lost the next 4 games.

1984/85:
The Canadiens celebrate their 75th anniversary by announcing their all-time team, while Guy LaFleur the team's all-time leading scorer retires on November 26th. Despite the loss of LaFleur the Canadiens would go on to win the Adams Division title with a 41-27-12 record. In the playoffs the Canadiens would beat the Boston Bruins in a hard fought 5-game series. However, in the Adams Division Finals the Habs would be stunned by the Quebec Nordiques in 7 games losing 3 games including the decisive 7th game in overtime. 

1985/86:
With 20-year old Goalie Patrick Roy playing in his first full season the Canadiens finish in 2nd place with a 40-33-7 record. In the playoffs Roy would start making a name for himself as he held the Boston Bruins to 6 goals as the y Habs swept their old rivals in 3 straight. Moving on the Adams Division Finals Roy was the backbone as the Canadiens fought off the Hartford Whalers in 7 games, allowing 1 or fewer goals in 5 out of the 7 games. The Canadiens would go on to make their first finals appearance in 7 years by beating the New York Rangers in 5 games. In the finals the Canadiens would be matched up against the Calgary Flames in the first all-Canadian final in 19 years. The Flames would get off to a fast start winning 5-2 in Game 1. However, the Habs would rally to take Game 2 in overtime and would go on to douse the Flames in 5 games claiming their 23rd Stanley Cup setting a professional team sports record for most championships. Patrick Roy who had a 1.92 GAA would go on to become the youngest player ever to win the Conn Smythe at the age of 20.

1986/87
:
Coming off their record 23rd Stanley Cup the Canadiens finish in 2nd place with a solid 41-29-10 record. In the playoffs the Habs would easily knock off the Boston Bruins sweeping them in 4 straight scoring 19 goals in the process. Moving on to the Adams Division Finals the Canadiens would hold off the Quebec Nordiques in 7 games to advance to the Wales Final. However, in the Wales Final the Canadiens would fall to the Philadelphia Flyers in 6 games.

1987/88
:
The Canadiens continue to be one of the premier teams in the NHL winning the Adams Division with a solid 45-22-13 record. In the playoffs the Habs would capsize the Hartford Whalers in 6 games. However, in the Adams Division Final the Canadiens would be stunned by the Boston Bruins in 5 games losing 4 straight after taking Game 1.

1988/89
:
Patrick Roy continues a Canadiens tradition as he captures his first Vezina Trophy becoming the 8th different Habs goalie to win the award and 25th overall. After winning the Adams Division with a 53-18-9 record the Canadiens would sweep the Hartford Whalers in the first round. In the Adams Division Final the Habs would beat the Boston Bruins in 5 games avenge their previous season's defeat. Moving on the Wales Final the Habs would get revenge for 1987 by beating the Philadelphia Flyers in 6 games. However, in a rematch of the 1986 Finals the Habs would be torched by the Calgary Flames in 6 games.

1989/90
:
Despite the departure of Bob Gainey and Larry Robinson the Canadiens remain one of the top teams in the NHL as they finish in 3rd place with a solid 41-28-11 record. In the playoffs the Habs would knock off the Buffalo Sabres in 6 games. However, facing the Boston Bruins for the 3rd year in a row in the Admass Division Finals the Habs would be knocked off in 5 games. 

1990/91:
The Canadiens continue to be one of the strongest teams in the NHL finishing in 2nd place with a 39-30-11 record. In the playoffs the Canadiens would knock off the Buffalo Sabres in 6 games during a high scoring s4eries that saw the Canadiens score 27 goals. However, in the Adams Division Finals the Habs would be eliminated by The Boston Bruins in a dramatic 7-game series.

1991/92
:
The NHL celebrated its 75th Anniversary as the Canadiens rose to the top of the Adams Division again with a 41-28-11 record. However in the playoffs the Habs would have trouble with Hartford Whalers who were one of the worst teams during the regular season but made the playoffs by finishing in 4th place. In the end the Canadiens would survive as they took Game 7 in overtime. However, in the Adams Division Finals the Habs would not be as lucky as they were swept by the Boston Bruins in 4 straight.

1992/93
:
In a season in which the hockey celebrated the 100th Anniversary of the dedication of the Stanley Cup the Canadiens put together another solid season with a 48-30-6 record. In the first round the Canadiens would get off to a slow start losing the first 2 games to the Quebec Nordiques, including an overtime loss in Game 1. As the series shifted to Montreal the Canadiens captured an overtime win of their own as they went on to win 4 straight to advance to the next round. In the Adams Division Finals the Canadiens stayed on a roll beating the Buffalo Sabres in 4 straight. However, it was not as easy as it seemed, as the Habs needed 3 overtime wins. Moving on to the Wales Conference Finals the Canadiens were paying their best hockey of the season winning 8 straight including 5 in overtime. In the Wales Conference Final the Habs continued to work overtime as they beat the New York Islanders in 5 games including 2 more overtime wins. Facing the Los Angeles Kings led by Wayne Gretzky in the Finals the Canadiens desperately needed to change the momentum as hey railed Game 2 at the Forum 2-1, as they faced a 0-2 deficit. Coach Jacques Demers decided to challenge the stick used by Kings Enforcer Marty MacSorley. His instinct were proven right as the curve was determined to be illegal setting up the Habs on the power play. The Canadiens would go onto tie the game forcing overtime where they won their record 8th straight playoff OT game. As the series shifted to Los Angeles the Habs continued their overtime magic taking 2 more games in extra time to establish a 3-1 series lead heading home. In Game 5 the Habs would not need overtime as Eric Desjardins record a hat trick in the Canadiens 4-1 win. The win gave the Canadiens their 24th Stanley Cup Championship, by far the most in the silver chalet's 100-yearhistory. Earning Conn Smythe honors for the 2nd time was Goalie Patrick Roy, who has a 2.13 GAA.

1993/94
:
The Canadiens remain an NHL force as they finish in 3rd place in the newly renamed Northeast Division with a solid 41-29-14 record. However in the first round the Canadiens have a 3-2 series lead slip through their fingers as they are beaten by the Boston Bruins in 7 games.

1994/95
:
In a season cut in half by a 4-month lockout the Canadiens miss the playoffs for the first time in 25 years, and just the 3rd time 55 years with a disappointing 18-23-7 record.

1995/96:
The Canadiens would get off to a slow start as Coach Jacques Demers is fired. New Coach Mario Tremblay instantly found himself embroiled in controversy as he refused to pull goalie Patrick Roy in a blowout loss to the Detroit Red Wings at the Forum. It would end up being Roy's final game as a Canadian as he is traded to the Colorado Avalanche just days later. However, after the deal the Canadiens played strong hockey with Jocelyn Thibault in the nets. March 11th would see another era end in Montreal as the Canadiens beat the Dallas Stars 4-1 in the final game at the Montreal Forum. Following the game a touching ceremony had al the Canadiens living captains on the ice passing the torch to each other. Five days later the torch was carried to the Molson Centre where they beat the New York Rangers in their first game at their new home. The Canadiens would go on to finish in 3rd place with a solid 40-32-10 record. In the playoffs they Habs would get off to a fast start as they won 2 straight over the Rangers in New York. However, the ghost of the Forum did not move with them as the Rangers rebounded to win the next 4 including 4 at the Canadiens new sate of the art arena. However, what must have been more painful to Canadiens management was that the Colorado Avalanche won the Stanley Cup led by goalie Patrick Roy.

1996/97: Despite a mediocre 31-36-15 record the Canadiens make the playoffs as the 8th seed holding off the Hartford Whalers by 2 points. However the Canadiens would be eliminated quickly in the playoffs as they are beaten by the New Jersey Devils led by Coach Jacques Lemaire in 5 games. Following the season controversial Coach Mario Termblay would be fired and replaced by Alain Vigneault.

1997/98:
With new coach Alain Vigneault the Canadiens get back into the playoffs by finishing in 4th place with a 37-32-13 record.  In the playoffs the Canadiens would show signs of brilliance as they stunned the 2nd seeded Pittsburgh Penguins in 6 games. However, all the energy the Habs had was gone as they were swept by the Buffalo Sabres in the 2nd round.

1998/99
:
The Canadiens finish in last place for the first time in 59 years missing the playoffs with a disappointing 32-39-11 record.

1999/00:
The Canadiens get off to another slow start as Michel Therrien takes over as Coach less then 2 months into the season. Under Therrien the Habs would play much better, but would miss the playoffs for the 2nd year in a row with a 35-38-9-4 record. For the Canadiens it was the first time since 1922 that they missed the postseason 2 years in a row.

2000/01:
The Canadiens struggle continues as they miss the playoffs for the 3rd year in a row just the 2nd time since the formation of the NHL that they missed the playoffs 3 consecutive season. While the Canadiens were finishing in last place with a 28-40-8-6 record, change was being made at the top as the franchise is purchased by George N. Gillett Jr.

2001/02
:
Before the season started the Canadiens were dealt a blow when Captain Saku Koivu announced he had non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, a deadly form of cancer in his abdomen. While Koivu underwent extensive chemotherapy, goalie Jose Theodore kept the Canadiens in the playoff chase. The chemo treatments worked as the cancer in Koivu's stomach was beaten into remission. As the season was winding down Koivu decided he wanted to make a comeback, while he began working out with the team, the inspired Canadiens got hot and climbed up the standing and into the 8th and final playoff spot. On the same day April 9th that Koivu made his return with a 7-minute standing Ovation at the Molson Center the Canadiens beat the Ottawa Senators in overtime to clinch a playoff berth. In the playoffs the Habs remained hot as they planted top seeded Boston Bruins in 6 games. In the 2nd round the Habs were looking strong again as they led the Carolina Hurricanes in Game by 3 goals entering the 3rd period with a chance to take a 3-1 series lead. However the Hurricanes would storm back to take the game in overtime, and would go on to win the series in 6 games. However, despite the late struggles the Canadiens became contenders again posting a 36-31-12-3 record, ending a string of 3 straight losing seasons while Goalie Jose Theodore became the 28th Canadiens Goalie to win the Vezina Trophy. In addition he would receive the Hart Trophy as NHL MVP for keeping the Canadiens alive in the playoff chase.

2002/03
:
Coming off a year in which he won both the Vezina and Hart Trophy Jose Theodore came into camp out of shape and it would show in his play as he struggled all season as the Canadiens played mediocre hockey. The Habs lackluster play would even cost Coach Michel Therian his job as he was replaced in the middle of the season by Claude Julien. However the Habs would not play any better as they missed the playoffs for the 4th time in 5 years with a record of 30-35-8-9. Following the season the Canadiens would hire former Captain Bob Gainey as their new General Manager with the hopes of bringing creditability back to the organization.

2003/04
:
The Canadiens would begin the Gainey era with a slow start as they played mediocre hockey for the first 3 months. One early highlight came on November 22nd when the Canadiens played the Edmonton Oilers at Edmonton's Commonwealth stadium in the first outdoor game in NHL history. The Canadiens would steal the show winning 4-3 before a record 57,167 fans. As January started as they won 7 of their first 9 in the New Year. Hoping to add scoring the Canadiens acquired Alexei Kovalev from the New York Rangers just before the trade deadline. Kovalev would struggle to adjust to his new surroundings but the Canadiens would not, making the playoffs with a 41-30-7-4 record. Leading the way for the Canadiens was Mike Ribeiro and Rookie Michael Ryder who each topped 60 points. In the playoffs the Habs would get off to a slow start falling behind the Boston Bruins 3 games to 1. However, suddenly the Canadiens would come alive as Jose Theodore made 43 saves in a 5-2 win in Game 5. The Habs would stay hot in Game 6 winning 5-1 to force a 7th game, where Theodore was the hero again stopping all 26 shots as the Canadiens broke a 0-0 tie with two goals in the 3rd period by Richard Zednik. However, in the second round the Canadiens would run into a buzz saw as they were swept in four straight by the eventual Stanley Cup Champion Tamp Bay Lightning.

2004/05:
Season Cancelled Due to Lock Out

2005/06:
Coming out of the Lock Out the Canadiens started off strong winning 12 of their first 16 games. However, the Canadiens started to struggle in November 7 of their next 9 as their great start was nearly washed away by three months of mediocre hockey that saw them post losing records in November, December, and January, as Coach Claude Julien was fired and replaced by GM Bob Gainey, while Goalie Jose Theodore struggled. Theodore's season would go from bad to worse as he suffered a heel injury off the ice, and then he failed a pre-Olympic drug test, receiving a two-year ban from International play. While Theodore was out, back up Cristobal Huet played well, eventually leading the Habs to deal Theodore a one-time Hart Trophy winner to the Colorado Avalanche for Goalie David Aebischer. With Huet and Aebischer in the net the Canadiens would have a strong March, as they made the playoffs for the 77th time with a 42-31-9 record. In the playoffs the seventh seeded Canadiens got off to a real strong start winning the first two games on the road against the Carolina Hurricanes 6-1 and 6-5. With a chance to take a commanding 3-0 series lead at home the Canadiens held a 1-0 lead midway through the 3rd Period. However, Captain Saku Koivu would suffer and injury on a stick to the eye from Justin Williams, as the Hurricanes came back and won 2-1 in overtime. Koivu would be knocked out the rest of the series as the Hurricanes would not lose another game, winning 4 straight 1-goal games to eliminate the Canadiens, on the way to winning the Stanley Cup. Following the season, Gainey went back to the front office as former Captain Guy Carbonneau was named Coach.

2006/07:
Coming into the season, the Canadiens were hoping to build off their trip to the playoffs, with a new Coach Guy Carbonneau who had been a big part of the team during its last two championship runs. For much of the first three months things looked good in Montreal as the Canadiens were off to a strong start posting a 21-8-5 record through their first 34 games. However, as the winter's chill gripped the NHL the Canadiens started to struggle losing six of eight. In February things got worse, as the Habs lost eight of nine with Cristobal Huet also being lost to a hamstring injury. With back up Goalie David Aebischer struggling the Canadiens were in danger of missing the playoffs. To try to reverse their fortunes the Habs benched Aebischer in favor of Jaroslav Halak who played well, winning five in a row to get the Habs a chance to make a late run for the postseason. The run would last into April when the Habs had destiny in their own hands. However, losses to the New York Rangers and Toronto Maple Leafs in their last two games doomed them to missing the playoffs with a record of 42-34-6.

2007/08
:
The Canadiens entered the season with not the loftiest expectations after missing the playoffs the previous season. However, they would get off to a strong start, posting a 6-2-2 record in their first ten games. Over the next two months the Canadiens continued to play well, as they entered the New Year with a record of 19-13-7. One of the reasons behind the Habs success was Rookie Goalie Carey Price, who was getting more chances to play as Coach Guy Charboneau's confidence grew in the 21-year old prospect. Eventually the Canadiens would turn to Price full-time, who was a finalist for the Calder Trophy while leading all rookies with 24 wins in the net, while Christobal Huet was traded to the Washington Capitals at the deadline. The Canadiens would play even better in the season's second half as they challenged for the top spot in the Eastern Conference. One of Huet's last wins in the Habs rouge, blanc, et bleu sweater nearly blew the roof off the Bell Centre as the Canadiens overcame a 5-0 deficit to defeat the New York Rangers in a shootout 6-5 on February 19th. On March 1st the Canadiens rise in the Eastern Conference reached its pinnacle as they took over first place with 2-1 win over the New Jersey Devils. It was the first time they were in first place this late in the season since winning the Stanley Cup in 1993. The Canadiens would go on to finish first overall in the East, winning their first division title since 1992, with a record of 47-25-10.  In the playoffs the Canadiens were matched up against the Boston Bruins, who they dominated in the regular season, as they set a franchise record with 11 straight wins, over their Original Six rival. That dominance continued as they won their first two games at home. After a 2-1 loss in overtime in Game 3, the Habs appeared to be on the way to an easy first round win, as Carey Price, earned his first career playoff shutout, blanking the Bruins 1-0 in Game 4, while stopping 27 shots. However, Price was shaky in the next two games, as the Bruins won both to force a seventh game. In Game 7 at the Bell Centre, the Canadiens would come with their A game, as they blanked the Bruins 5-0 to advance to the second round for the first time since the lockout. In the second round the Canadiens would face the Philadelphia Flyers. Down 3-2 in the final minute of Game 1, the Habs would force overtime as Alexei Kovalev netted a power play goal with the Canadiens net empty with 29 seconds left. In Overtime the Habs would not need much time for the game winner Tom Kostopoulos scored 48 seconds into the extra session. However, it would be the last moment Canadiens fans had to cheer during the season, as the Flyers would bounce back to win the next four games, taking the series in five games.

2008/09
:
The Canadiens began a Centennial celebration, as the oldest continuing operating franchise in the NHL and the most successful team with 24 Stanley Cups. However, without a cup since 1993 fans felt their 100th season would be perfect for them to return to the top of the hockey world especially after posting the best record in the Eastern Conference in the previous season. Early on things looked good for the Habs as they got off to a strong start, winning eight of their first ten games. The Canadiens would play strong hockey for most of the first half as they hosted the All-Star Game, with the Eastern Conference winning in a shootout 12-11, as Alexei Kovalev thrilled the home fans by winning MVP honors with two goals, and one assists, while shooting the clinched in the shootout. However, in the second half the Canadiens suddenly went into a tail spin, which started with a four game losing streak wrapped around the All-Star Break after they were sitting strong in the East with a solid 27-11-6. The struggles continued into February as the Habs as the four game losing streak was the start of a 15 game stretch, in which the Canadiens won just three games. The Canadiens would close February with four straight wins, but the Canadiens continued to play mediocre hockey in March, as the Canadiens who began the season with aspirations to win the Stanley Cup suddenly found themselves on the playoff bubble. The struggles would even coast Coach Guy Carbonneau his job as General Manager Bob Gainey took over behind the bench for the final 16 games. The Canadiens would end up making the playoffs, despite a season ending four game losing streak as they posted a 41-30-11 record, and gained the eighth seed via a tie breaker over the Florida Panthers. The struggles would continue into the playoffs as the Canadiens would go down without a fight, losing four straight games to the Boston Bruins, while being outscored 17-6. Following the season the Canadiens would undergo wholesale changes, as Jacques Martin was named their new coach, while Captain Saku Koivu was not offered a new contract, allowing him to sign with the Anaheim Ducks. The Canadiens would also lose All-Star Game MVP Alexei Kovalev to the Ottawa Senators. Meanwhile the team would be sold by George Gillett to a group headed Geoffrey, Justin and Andrew Molson, marking the third time the Habs would be owned by the Molson Family.

2009/10: Under new coach Jacques Martin, the Canadiens for the first time in franchise history began the year without a captain following the departure of Koivu. Early on in the season the Habs struggled, losing five straight after winning the first two games of the year in overtime. Through much of the first half of the season the Canadiens played mediocre hockey as they hovered around the .500 mark. The Canadiens went into the Olympic break with a 29-28-6 record as front office changes were made as General Manager Bob Gainey retired and was replaced by Pierre Gauthier. Coming out of the break the Canadiens played their best hockey of the season, winning seven of eight games to get back in playoff position. However, they would struggle the rest of the season, five of six games to end March. As April began the Habs won a key game with the Philadelphia Flyers 1-0, with Jaroslav Halak stopping 35 shots. Halak would also earn a shutout the following night against the Buffalo Sabres. The two shutout wins would be enough to get the Canadiens into the playoffs, as they got the eighth seed in the Eastern Conference despite losing their final three games to finish the year with a record of 39-33-10. In the playoffs the Canadiens were underdogs as they faced the Washington Capitals who won the President's Trophy as the best team in the regular season. However, in Game 1 with Jaroslav Halak stopping 45 of 497shots the Canadiens were able to earn an overtime win, as Tomas Plekanec scored at 13:19. The Capitals would bounce back to win Game 2 in overtime 6-5. As the series shifted to Montreal, the Canadiens struggled, losing both Game 3 and 4 by a combined score of 11-4. With their season on the brink the Canadiens got another big effort from Goalie Jaroslav Halak, who stopped 36 of 37 shots as they stayed alive with a 2-1 win in Game 5. In Game 6 it was more Halak, as he stopped 53 of 54 shots to lead the way to a 4-1 win that sent the series to a seventh game. In Game 7 Jaroslav Halak continued to steal the show stopping 41 of 42 shots as the Canadiens stunned the Capitals 2-1 to complete the comeback from a 3-1 deficit. In the second round the Canadiens had an equally hard draw in the defending Stanley Cup Champion Pittsburgh Penguins. After losing 6-3 in Game 1, the Canadiens got another big game from Halak to earn a split in the Igloo as he stopped 38 of 39 shots in a 3-1 win. However, back in Montreal the Canadiens stumbled in Game 3 losing 2-0. After allowing two first period goals Jaroslav was strong again in Game 4 stopping 33 of 35 shots, as the Canadiens rallied to win 3-2 on third period goals by Maxim Lapierre and Brian Gionta to even the series. After a 2-1 loss in Game 5, the Canadiens again faced elimination in Game 6. Once again they rose to the occasion led by Mike Cammalleri who scored two goals in a 4-3 win. In Game 7 it was Goalie Jaroslav Halak again who had a big day stopping 37 of 39 shots, as the Canadiens stunned the Penguins 5-2 to reach the Eastern Conference Finals. The Conference Finals featured the two last teams to qualify for the playoffs as the 8th seed Canadiens faced the #7 seed Philadelphia Flyers. Things looked bleak early for the Canadiens as they were shutout in the first two games 6-0 and 3-0. They would show signs of life with a 5-1 at Bell Centre in Game 3. However, once again the Canadiens put up a lackluster effort in Game 4 and were shutout again 3-0. This time there would be no comeback from down 3-1, as the Flyers closed out the series with a 4-2 win in Game 5. Following the season the Canadiens had a hard choice to make as both goalies Jaroslav Halak and Carey Price were restricted free agents. Unable to keep both the Habs need to make a choice, and despite Halak's heroic effort in the playoffs, the Canadiens chose Price, trading Halak to the St. Louis Blues for prospects, Lars Eller and Ian Schultz.

2010/11: Despite the heroic efforts that led the Canadiens to a surprise trip to the Eastern Conference Finals, Goalie Jaroslav Halak is dealt to the St. Louis Blues for Lars Eller and
Ian Schultz as the Habs decided to stick with Carey Price. After starting the season with a 3-2 loss to the Toronto Maple Leafs and a 3-2 win against the Pittsburgh Penguins the Canadiens suffered a 4-3 loss in overtime to the Tampa Bay Lightning in their home opener. Losses would be uncommon early in the season as the Canadiens posted a solid 7-3-1 record in October. The Canadiens would continue to play well through November, as they entered December with a record of 15-8-1. The Habs would spend much of December on the road, and struggled because of it, as they lost seven of ten away from the Bell Centre as they entered the New Year with a record of 21-16-2. The Habs would only drop two games in regulation during January, as they posted a 6-2-3 record, with the addition of James Wisniewski from the New York Islanders. The Canadiens would have their struggles in February and March as they were on the playoff bubble while playing mediocre hockey. On February 20th the Canadiens would be frozen out by the Calgary Flames in an outdoor game played at Calgary's McMahon Stadium. Meanwhile, the rivalary between the Canadiens and Boston Bruins took an ugly turn as the two teams had a fight filed game in Boston on February 10th, won by the Habs 8-6. When they met again at Bell Centre on March 8th, Max Pacioretty was the victim of a vicious hit by Zdeno Chara that ran him into the edge of the glass by the bench. Pacioretty, would be carried off the ice and lost for the season with a fractured neck and a severe concussion. Chara would get a five minute major and a game misconduct, but no suspension, despite the city of Montreal conducting a criminal investigation, as the Habs won the game 4-1. The Canadiens would get points in their final four games and would snag the sixth seed in the Eastern Conference Playoffs with a record of 44-30-8. In the playoffs the Canadiens would face the Boston Bruins, with the Pacioretty-Chara incident still fresh in everyone's minds. The Canadiens quickly took control of the series, winning the first two games in Boston, as Carey Price saved 65 of 66 shots as the Habs won 2-0 and 3-1. Looking to grab a stranglehold on Boston, the Canadiens came out flat at home, suffering a 4-2 loss in Game 3. The Canadiens had their chances in Game 4, as the game went to overtime. However, the Bruins would win again 5-4 on a goal by former Hab Michael Ryder. As the series moved back to Boston, the Bruins and Canadiens battled into double overtime, as the Bruins won again 2-1 on a goal by Nathan Horton. The Canadiens would rebound with a 2-1 win in Game 6 as Carey Price had 31 saves, while Brian Gionta's power play goal in the second period made the difference. Game 7 in Boston would also go to overtime, as P.K. Subban tied the game with a power play goal with 1:57 left. However, Nathan Horton would stun the Habs again with a goal at 5:43 to give the Bruins a 4-3 win. The Bruins would go on to win the Stanley Cup, as the Canadiens drought continued.

2011/12: In over 100 years of hockey, the Montreal Canadiens have had many proud seasons, winning the Stanley Cup a record 24 times as they made the playoffs a record 82 times. Not only did the Canadiens fail to make the playoffs, they had perhaps the worst season in team history as they were an embarrassment to the fans of Montreal on and off the ice. After losing to the Boston Bruins in the first round, losing a seven game heartbreaker to the eventual Stanley Cup Champions, the Canadiens had a rather quiet off-season as they failed to address several team needs, while losing key players like Roman Hamrlik and Jeff Halpren. Things started bad from the start, for the Canadiens as they lost 2-0 to the Toronto Maple Leafs, as they won just one of their first eight games, for their worst start in 71 years. The Canadiens would show some signs of life in November, as Carey Price recorded back to back shutouts. With their power play struggling, the Habs would acquire Tomas Kaberle from the Carolina Hurricanes on December 9th in exchange for defenseman Jaroslav Spacek. Spacek picked up two assists in a 2-1 road win over the New Jersey Devils. However, it was one of the lone bright spots as the Canadiens continued to struggle when GM Pierre Gauthier fired Coach Jacques Martin on December 17th, as the Habs held a subpar record of 13-12-7. The choice of interim Coach Randy Cunneyworth would not go over well in Montreal, as Cunneyworth did speak any French. The Canadiens would lose their first five games under new coach and seven of eight as they entered the New Year with a record of 14-18-7. Frustrations would boil over in January, as Michael Cammalleri was traded to the Calgary Flames after making disparaging remarks about the team. In return the Habs who also dealt Karri Ramo received Rene Bourque, Patrick Holland, and a second round pick in the 2013 NHL Draft. With the playoffs out of reach, the Canadiens began dealing away players and stocking up on prospects and draft picks, as Hal Gill and Andrei Kostitsyn were sent to the Nashville Predators for Blake Geoffrion, Robert Slaney and two draft picks. Geoffrion blood lines lay deep in the Canadiens glorious past as his maternal Grandfather is Howie Morenz, while Boom Boom Geoffrion is his paternal grandfather. The Canadiens would go on to finish with the worst record in the Eastern Conference at 31-35-16. One of the only bright spots was the play of Max Pacioretty, who came back from his concussion and neck injury to lead the team in scoring with 33 goals and 32 assists, while Erik Cole ranked second while leading the Habs with 35 goals and 26 assists. Following the season, as the Canadiens were once again owned by the Molson Family a complete house cleaning of the front office was made as Marc Bergevin was named the new General Manager, while Michel Therrien who coached the Canadiens from 2000-2003 was hired to lead the Habs once again.

  
2012/13
:
After one of the worst seasons in the history of Les Canadiens, the team underwent a complete front office makeover, with Marc Bergevin with Michel Therrien, who coached the Habs from 2000-2003 getting a second tenure in Montreal. When the season began in January after a three month lockout, expectations were not very high as most though the Canadiens would finish in last place again as they lost to the Toronto Maple Leafs 2-1 in their season opener on January 21st, but quickly got back on track with four straight wins. The Canadiens continued their strong play in February and March as they won nine games in each month and found themselves at the top of the Eastern Conference standings. Pacing the Canadiens turnaround was a strong defense and solid goaltending, led by Carey Price, who coming off a disappointing 2011/12 season won 18 of his first 28 starts, while back up Peter Budaj won eight of his ten starts and had just one regulation loss. Both goalies had save percentages better than .900 and combined for four shutouts.  A big reason for the success of Price and Budaj was the Canadiens pesky defenseman P.K. Subban, who after sitting out the first four games to work out a new contract with the Canadiens established himself as one of the best defenseman in the NHL, scoring 11 goals and 27 assists, as he matched his career-high 38 points despite playing in only 42 games because of the lockout-shortened season. P.K. Subban would become the first black player to win a season long NHL award in NHL history, by capturing the Norris Trophy as the best Defenseman in the NHL. The Canadiens would have a mini slump as the season came to a close, with just a 7-7-0 record in April. However, their 29-14-5 mark was good enough to win the Northeast Division Championship and get the second seed for the playoffs.

2013 Playoffs: In the playoffs the Canadiens would face the Ottawa Senators, in a battle of hard hitting defensive teams. Game 1 would set the tone of the series, as Senators Defenseman Eric Gryba was given a five minute major penalty, a game misconduct, and a two game suspension after delivering a hit on Montreal's Lars Eller that sent the Canadiens Center to the hospital. Eller who was one of the Habs top scorers in the regular season with eight goals and 22 assists would be lost for the remainder of the series as the Senators won the opener 4-2. The Canadiens would rebound to even the series with a 3-1 win in Game 2. As the series shifted to Ottawa, the emotions would boil over as the two teams combined for 236 penalty minutes with the Senators winning 6-1. Things looked good for Montreal in Game 4, as they jumped out to a 2-0 lead. The Senators would cut the lead to 2-1 with just over nine minutes left. Then with time running out the Senators tied the game on a goal by Cory Conacher with 23 seconds left. The goal was reviewed but allowed to stand despite it appearing that it was knocked past Carey Price with a kicking motion. Making matters worse Price suffered a groin injury on the play and was unable to play in overtime. With Peter Budaj coming into the game cold, the Senators quickly won the game 3-2 on a goal by Kyle Turris. Budaj would get the start in Game 5, as the Canadiens quickly unraveled, losing 6-1 as the Senators won the series in five games.

Logo
1952-Present
105th Season
First Game Played January 5, 1910*
*-Played in NHA 1910-1917
 
 
 
 
 
Address:
1260 Gauchetière St. West
Montreal, PQ H3B 5E8
Phone: (514) 932-2582

Web:
http://www.canadiens.com

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Coaches: (34)
Jack Laviolette 1909/10
Adolphe Lecours 1910/11
Napoléon Dorval 1911/12-1912/13
Jimmy Garner 1913/14-1914/15
Newsy Lalonde 1915/16-1921/22
Leo Dandurand 1921/22-1925/26
Cecil Hart 1926/27-1931/32
Newsy Lalonde 1932/33-1934/35
Leo Dandurand 1934/35
Sylvio Mantha 1935/36
Cecil Hart 1936/37-1938/39
Jule Dugal 1938/39
Pit Lepine 1939/40
Dick Irvin 1940/41-1954/55
Toe Blake 1955/56-1967/68
Claude Ruel 1968/69-1970/71
Al MacNeil 1970/71
Scotty Bowman 1971/72-1978/79
Bernie Geoffrion  1979/80
Claude Ruel 1979/80-1980/81
Bob Berry 1981/82-1983/84
Jacques Lemaire 1983/84-1984/85
Jean Perron 1985/86-1987/88
Pat Burns 1988/89-1991/92
Jacques Demers 1992/93-1995/96
Mario Tremblay 1995/96-1996/97
Alain Vineault 1997/98-2000/01
Michel Therrien 2000/01-2002/03
Claude Julien 2002/03-2005/06
Bob Gainey 2005/06
Guy Carbonneau 2006/07-2008/09
Bob Gainey 2008/09
Jacques Martin 2009/10-2011/12
Randy Cunneyworth 2011/12
Michel Therrien 2012/13-Present 

 
 
 
Arenas: (5)
Jubilee Rink 1909/10
Westmount Arena 1910-1918
Jubilee Arena 1917-1919
Mount Royal Arena 1919-1926
Montreal Forum 1926-1996
Bell Centre* 1995-Present

*-Known as Molson Centre 1995-2002
 
Stanley Cup Champions: (24)
1916, 1924, 1930, 1931, 1944, 1946, 1953, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1973, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1986, 1993

Stanley Cup Finals: (35)
1914, 1916, 1917 ,1919, 1924, 1925, 1930, 1931, 1944, 1946, 1947, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1973, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1986, 1989, 1993

Confrence Finals (Since 1968): (14)
1968, 1969, 1971, 1973, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1993, 2010

President's Trophy:
None

Division Champions: (35)
1918, 1928, 1929, 1931, 1932, 1937, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1956, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1964, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1973, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1985, 1988, 1989, 1992, 2008, 2013

Playoff Appearences: (83)
1914, 1916, 1917, 1918, 1919, 1923, 1924 ,1925, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1941, 1942, 1943, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1950, 1951, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1955, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013
 
 
Hall of Famers: (60)
Marty Barry C 1939/40
Jean Beliveau C 50/51, 1952-1971
Toe Blake LW 1935-1948
Butch Bouchard D 1941-1956
Scotty Bowman Coach 1971-1979
Harry Cameron D 1919/20
Joseph Cattarinich Owner 1921-31
Chris Chelios D 1983-1990
Sprague Cleghorn D 1921-1925
Yvan Cournoyer RW 1963-1979
Léo Dandurand Owner 1921-1947
Dick Duff LW 1964-1970
Gordie Drillon LW 1942/43
Ken Dryden G 1970-73, 1974-79
Bill Durnan G 1943-1950
Tony  Esposito G 1968/69
Bob Gainey LW 1973-1989
Herb Gardiner D 1926-1929
Jimmy Gardner LW 1913-1915
Boom Boom Geoffrion RW 1950-64
Doug Gilmour C 2001-2003
Tommy Gorman GM 1940-1946

George Hainsworth G 26-33, 36/37
Joe Hall D 1917-1919
Doug Harvey D 1947-1961
Tom Johnson D 1949-1963
Aurel Joliat LW 1922-1938
Elmer Lach C 1940-1954
Guy Lafleur RW 1971-1985
Rod Langway D 1980-1982
Newsy Lalonde D 1909-1922
Jacques Laperriere D 1962-1971
Guy Lapointe D 1968-1982
Jack Laviolette LW 1909-1918
Jacques Lemaire D 1967-1979
Frank Mahovlich LW 1970-1974
Joe Malone C 1917-19, 1922-1924
Sylvio Mantha D 1923-1936
Hartland Molson Owner 1957-1968
Dickie Moore RW 1951-1963
Howie Morenz C 1923-1937
Reg Noble LW 1916/17
Buddy O'Connor C 1941-1947
Murry Olmstead LW 1950-1958
Didier Pitre RW 1909-1923
Jacques Plante G 1950-1963
Sam Pollock Director 1947-1971
Donat Raymond Forum 1923-1955
Kenny Reardon D 1940-42, 1945-50
Henri Richard C 1955-1975
Maurice Richard RW 1942-1960
Larry Robinson D 1972-1989
Patrick Roy G 1984-1996
Denis Savard C 1990-1993
Serge Savard D 1966-1981
Frank Selke President 1946-1964
Steve Shutt LW 1972-1985
Babe Siebert LW 1936-1939
Tommy Smith LW 1916/17
Georges Vezina G 1910-1926
Gump Worsley G 1964-1970
Roy Worters G 1929/30
 
 
 
Retired Numbers: (18)
  1 Jaques Plante  G 1950-1963
  2 Doug Harvey  D 1947-1961
  3 Emile Bouchard D 1941-1956
  4 Jean Beliveau C 50/51, 1952-71
  5 Boom Boom Geoffrion
RW 50-64
  7 Howie Morenz C 1926-1937
  9 Maurice Richard RW 1942-1960
10 Guy Lafleur RW 1971-1985
12 Yvan Cournoyer RW 1963-1979
12 Dickie Moore RW 1951-1963
16 Elmer Lach C 1940-1954
16 Henri Richard C 1955-1975
18 Serge Savard D 1966-1981
19 Larry Robinson D 1972-1989
23 Bob Gainey LW 1973-1989
29 Ken Dryden G 1970-73, 1974-79
33 Patrick Roy G 1984-1996
99 Wayne Gretzky
(Retired by NHL)
 
 
©MMXIII Tank Productions. Stats researched by Frank Fleming, all information, and team names are property of the National Hockey League.  This site is not affiliated with the Montreal Candiens or the NHL. This site is maintained for research purposes only. All logos used on this page were from Chris Creamer's Sports Logos Page.
Page created on November 5, 2002. Last updated on December , 2013 at 10:45 pm ET.  

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Captains: (33)
Jack Laviolette 1909/10
Newsy Lalonde 1910/11
Jack Laviolette 1911/12
Newsy Lalonde 1912/13
Jimmy Gardner 1913-1915
Howard Mc Namara 1915/16
Newsy Lalonde* 1916-1922
Sprague Cleghorn 1922-1925
Bill Coutu 1925/26
Sylvio Mantha 1926-1932
George Hainsworth 1932/33
Sylvio Mantha 1933-1936
Babe Siebert 1936-1939
Walter Buswell 1939/40
Toe Blake 1940-1948
Bill Durnan 1947/48
Butch Bouchard 1948-1956
Maurice Richard 1956-1960
Doug Harvey 1960/61
Jean Béliveau 1961-1971
Henri Richard 1971-1975
Yvan Cournoyer 1975-1979
Serge Savard 1979-1981
Bob Gainey 1981-1989
Guy Carbonneau 1989/90
Chris Chelios 1989/90
Guy Carbonneau 1990-1994
Kirk Muller 1994/95
Mike Keane 1994-1996
Pierre Turgeon 1995/96
Vincent Damphousse 1996-1999
Saku Koivu 1999/00-2008/09
None 2009/10
Brian Gionta 2010/11-Present
 
 
 
All-Star Games Hosted: (12)
1953, 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1965, 1967, 1969, 1975, 1993, 2009

All-Star Game MVP: (5)
1964 Jean Beliveau C
1967 Henri Richard C
1976 Peter Mahovlich C
1997 Mike Recchi RW
2009 Alex Kovalev RW
 
 
Awards:
Jack Adams Award (Top Coach): (2)
1977 Scotty Bowman
1989 Pat Burns

Calder Trophy (Top Rookie): (6)
1941 John Quilty C
1952 Boom Booom Geoffrion RW
1959 Ralph Backstrom C
1962 Bobby Rousseau RW
1964 Jacques Laperreiere D
1972 Ken Dryden G

Masterton Trophy
(Dedication): (5)
1968 Claude Provost RW
1974 Henri Richard C
1979 Serge Savard D
2002 Saku Koivu C
2012 Max Pacioretty LW

Lady Byng  (Gentlemanly Play): (2)
1946 Toe Blake LW
1988 Mats Naslund RW

Selke Trophy (Defensive Fwd): (7)
1978 Bob Gainey LW
1979 Bob Gainey LW
1980 Bob Gainey LW
1981 Bob Gainey LW
1988 Guy Charboneau C
1989 Guy Charboneau C
1992 Guy Charboneau C

Norris Trophy (Defenseman): (12)
1955 Doug Harvey
1956 Doug Harvey
1957 Doug Harvey
1958 Doug Harvey
1959 Tom Johnson
1960 Doug Harvey
1961 Doug Harvey
1962 Doug Harvey
1966 Jacques Laperriere
1977 Larry Robison
1980 Larry Robison
2013 P.K. Subban

Vezina Trophy (Top Goalie): (28)
1927 George Hainsworth
1928 George Hainsworth
1929 George Hainsworth
1944 Bill Durnan
1945 Bill Durnan
1946 Bill Durnan
1947 Bill Durnan
1949 Bill Durnan
1950 Bill Durnan
1956 Jacques Plante
1957 Jacques Plante
1958 Jacques Plante
1959 Jacques Plante
1960 Jacques Plante
1962 Jacques Plante
1964 Charlie Hodge
1966
Gump Worsley/Charlie Hodge
1968
Gump Worsley/ Rogie Vachon
1973 Ken Dryden
1976 Ken Dryden
1977
Ken Dryden/ Bunny Larocque
1978
Ken Dryden/ Bunny Larocque
1979
Ken Dryden/ Bunny Larocque
1981
R. Sevigny/ Denis Heron/Larocque
1989 Patrick Roy
1990 Patrick Roy
1992 Patrick Roy
2002 Jose Theodore

Hart Trophy (NHL MVP): (16)
1927 Herb Gardiner D
1928 Howie Morenz C
1931 Howie Morenz C
1932 Howie Morenz C
1934 Aurel Joliat LW
1937 Babe Siebert D
1939 Toe Blake LW
1945 Elmer Lach C
1947 Maurice Richard RW
1956 Jean Beliveau C
1961 Boom Boom Geoffrin RW
1962 Jacques Plante G
1964 Jean Beliveau C
1977 Guy Lafleur RW
1978 Guy Lafleur RW
2002 Jose Theodore G
 
 
 
Conn Smythe (Playoff MVP): (9)
1965 Jean Beliveau C
1969 Serge Savard D
1971 Ken Dryden G
1973 Yvan Cournoyer RW
1977 Guy Lafleur RW
1978 Larry Robinson D
1979 Bob Gainey LW
1986 Patrick Roy G
1993 Patrick Roy G
 
 
Best Season:
1976/77 (60-8-12, 132 pts)

Worst Season:

1939/40 (10-3-33-5, 25 pts)
 
 
 
Minor League Afilliates:
Hamilton Bulldogs (AHL)
Wheeling Nailers (ECHL)
 
 
On The Air:
Televsion:
TSN, RDS-French

Radio
:
CKGM(690 AM); CHMP  (98.5 FM)- French

Broadcasters
:

Rod Black, Darren Eliot, Mike Johnson, and Gord Miller, Dave Randorf-TV; Marc Denis and Pierre Houde-French TV, John Bartlett, Bobby Dollas and Sergio Momesso--Radio; Danny Dube and Martin McGuire-French

Foster Hewittt Award Winners
: (4)
Danny Gallivan 1952-1984
Rene Lecavalier 1952-1985
Doug Smith 1948-1955
Gilles Tremblay 1971-1998

Mascot:
Youppi!
 
 
 
Team Motto:
"To you from failing hands we throw the torch. Be yours to hold it high".
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