Nickname:
Nicknamed Cubs in 1902 because the number of young players they had on their team the nickname stuck.
 
Manager:
Rick Renteria 2014-

Stadium
:

Wrigley Field 1916-

 
Logo
1979-Present
139th Season
First Game Played April 25, 1876
 
 
 
 
 
Address:
1060 West Addison
Chicago, IL 60613-4397
Phone: (773) 404-CUBS

Web:
http://www.cubs.com
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Managers: (59)
Al Spalding 1876-1877
Bob Ferguson 1878
Cap Anson 1879
Steve Flint 1879
Cap Anson 1880-1897
Tom Burns 1898-1899
Tom Loftus 1900-1901
Frank Selee 1902-1905
Frank Chance 1905-1912
Johnny Evers 1913
Hank O'Day 1914
Roger Bresnahan 1915
Joe Tinker 1916
Fred Mitchell 1917-1920
Johnny Evers 1921
Bill Killefer 1921-1925
Rabbit Maranaville 1925
George Gibson 1925
Joe McCarthy 1926-1930
Rogers Hornsby 1930-1932
Charlie Grimm 1932-1938
Gabby Hartnett 1938-1940
Jimmy Wilson 1941-1944
Roy Johnson 1944
Charlie Grimm 1944-1949
Frankie Frisch 1949-1951
Phil Cavarretta 1951-1953
Stan Hack 1954-1956
Bob Scheffing 1957-1959
Charlie Grimm 1960
Lou Bodreau 1960
College of Coaches 1961-1962*
Bob Kennedy 1963-1965
Lou Klein 1965
Leo Durocher 1966-1972
Whitey Lockman 1972-1974
Jim Marshall 1974-1976
Herman Franks 1977-1979
Joey Amalfitano 1979
Preston Gomez 1980
Joey Amalfitano 1980-1981
Lee Elia 1982-1983
Charlie Fox 1983
Jim Frey 1984-1986
John Vukovich 1986
Gene Michael 1986-1987
Frank Lucchesi 1987
Don Zimmer 1988-1991
Joe Atobelli 1991
Jim Essian 1991
Jim Lefebvre 1992-1993
Tom Treblehorn 1994
Jim Riggleman 1995-1999
Don Baylor 2000-2002
Bruce Kimm 2002
Dusty Baker 2003-2006
Lou Piniella 2007-2010
Mike Quade 2010-2011
Dale Sveum 2012-2013
Rick Renteria 2014-Present
*-1961 Coaches: Harry Craft, Vedie Himsl, Lou Klein, and El Tappe
1962 Coaches: Lou Klein, Charlie Metro, and El Tappe

 
 
 
Stadiums: (6)
State Street Grounds  1876-1877
Lakefront Park 1878-1884
West Side Park 1885-1891
Southside Park 1891-1893
West Side Grounds 1893-1915
Wrigley Field  1916- Present*
*-Known as Weeghman Park 1916-1917
& Cubs Park 1918-1925
 
World Champions: (2)
1907, 1908

World Series Appearances: (10)
1906, 1907, 1908, 1910, 1918, 1929, 1932, 1935, 1938, 1945

LCS Appearances: (3)
1984, 1989, 2003

NL Champions: (6)
1876, 1880, 1881, 1882, 1885, 1886

Division Champions: (5)
1984, 1989, 2003, 2007, 2008

Wild Card: (1)
1998
 
 
Hall of Famers: (43)
Grover C. Alexander RHP 1918-26
Cap Anson 1B 1876-1897

Richie Ashburn OF 1960-1961

Ernie Banks SS-1B 1953-1971

Roger Bresnahan C 1900, 1913-1915
Lou Brock OF 1961-1964

Mordicai Brown RHP 1904-13, 16
Frank Chance 1B 1898-1912

John Clarkson RHP 1884-1887

Kiki Cuyler OF 1928-1935
Andre Dawson OF 1988-1992
Dizzy Dean RHP 1938-1941
Hugh Duffy OF 1898-1899
Leo Durocher MGR 1966-1971
Dennis Eckersley RHP 1984-1986

Johnny Evers 2B 1902-1913

Jimmie Foxx 1B 1942, 1944
Goose Gossage RHRP 1988
Burleigh Grimes RHP 1932-1933

Gabby Hartnett C 1922-1940
Billy Herman 2B 1931-1941
Rogers Hornsby 1929-1932
Ferguson Jenkins RHP 66-73, 82-83
George Kelly 1B 1930
King Kelly OF 1880-1886
Chuck Klein OF 1934-1936
Ralph Kiner OF 1953-1954
Tony Lazzeri SS 1938

Freddie Lindstrom OF 1935
Greg Maddux RHP 1986-92, 2004-06

Rabbit Maranville OF 1925
Joe McCarthy MGR 1926-1930
Robin Roberts RHP 1966

Ryne Sandberg 2B 1982-94, 1996-97
Ron Santo 3B 1960-1973

Frank Selee MGR 1902-1905
Al Spalding RHP 1876-1878

Bruce Sutter RHRP 1976-1980
Joe Tinker SS 1902-1912, 1916
Rube Waddell LHP 1901
Hoyt Wilhelm RHP 1970

Billy Williams OF 1959-1974
Hack Wilson OF 1926-1931

 
 
 
 
 
Retired Numbers: (7)
10 Ron Santo 3B 1960-1973
14 Earnie Banks SS & 1B 1953-1971
23 Ryne Sandberg 2B 1982-94, 96-97
26 Billy Williams OF 1959- 1974
31 Ferguson Jenkins RHP
66-73, 82-83
31 Greg Maddux RHP 1986-92, 04-06
42 Jackie Robinson
(Retired by MLB)
 
 
All-Star Games Hosted: (3)
1947, 1962, 1990

All-Star Game MVP
: (1)
1975 Bill Madlock 3B
 
 
AWARDS
Triple Crown Winners: (2)
1918 Hippo Vaughn LHP
1920 Grover C. Alexander RHP

Manager of the Year
: (3)
1984 Jim Frey
1989 Don Zimmer

2008 Lou Piniella

Rookie of the Year: (5)
1961 Billy Williams OF
1962 Ken Hubbs 2B
1989 Jerome Walton OF
1998 Kerry Wood RHP
2008 Geovany Soto C

Fireman Award: (2)
1979 Bruce Sutter RHP
1993 Randy Myers LHP

Hank Aaron Award
: (2)
1999 Sammy Sosa OF
2008 Aramis Ramirez 3B

Cy Young: (4)
1971 Ferguson Jenkins RHP
1979 Bruce Sutter RHRP
1984 Rick Sutcliffe RHP
1992 Greg Maddux RHP

MVP: (10)
1911 Wildfire Schultze OF
1929 Rogers Hornsby 2B
1935 Gabby Hartnett C
1945 Phil Cavaretta 1B
1952 Hank Sauer OF
1958 Ernie Banks SS
1959 Ernie Banks SS
1984 Ryne Sandberg 2B
1987 Andre Dawson OF
1998 Sammy Sosa OF
 
 
LCS MVP:
None

World Series MVP:
None
 
 
 
 
Best Season:
1906 (116-36)

Worst Season
:
1962 & 1966 (59-103)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alternate Logo
1997-Present
No Hitters: (13)
8/19/1880 Larry Corcoran
9/20/1882 Larry Corcoran
6/27/1884 Larry Corcoran
7/27/1885 John Clarkson
8/21/1898 Walter Thornton
8/31/1915 Jimmy Lavender
5/12/1955 Sam Jones
5/15/1960 Don Cardwell
8/19/1969 Ken Holtzman
6/3/1971 Ken Holtzman
4/16/1972 Burt Hooton
9/2/1972 Milt Pappas
9/14/2008 Carlos Zambrano


Cycle Hitters: (11)
7/28/1888 Jimmy Ryan
9/7/1891 Jimmy Ryan
6/23/1930 Hack Wilson
9/30/1933 Babe Herman
6/28/1950 Roy Smalley
7/2/1957 Lee Walls
7/17/1966 Billy Williams
8/11/1966 Randy Hundley
4/22/1980 Ivan DeJesus
4/29/1987 Andre Dawson
5/9/1993 Mark Grace 

Unassisted Triple Plays
: (1)
5/30/1927 Jimmy Cooney 
 
On the Air:
Television:
WGN (Channel 9); WCIU (Channel 26); Comcast Sportsnet Chicago 

Radio
:
WGN (720 AM); WRTO (1200 AM)-Spanish

Broadcasters
:
Jim Deshaies and Len Kasper-TV; Ron Coomer and Pat Hughes -Radio; Elio Benitez and Hector Fabregas-Spanish

Ford C. Frick Recipients
: (4)
Jack Brickhouse 1940-1981
Harry Caray 1982-1998
Bob Elison 1930-1971
Milo Hamilton 1955-1957
 
 
 
 
 
Spring Training History: (19)
Champaign, IL 1901-1902
Los Angeles, CA 1903-1904
Santa Monica, CA 1905
Champaign, IL 1906
New Orleans, LA 1907
Vicksburg, MS 1908
Hot Springs, AR 1909-1910
New Orleans, LA 1911-1912
Tampa, FL 1913- 1916
Pasadena, FL 1917-1921
Catalina Island, CA 1922-1942
French Lick, IN 1943-1945
Catalina Island, CA 1946-1947
Los Angeles, CA 1948-1949
Catalina Island, CA 1950-1951
Mesa, AZ 1952-1965
Long Beach, CA 1966
Scottsdale, AZ 1967-1978
Mesa, AZ 1979-Present

 
Team Song:
Go Cubs Go

Baseball and the Cubs

7th Inning Stretch
:
While announcing for the Cubs 1981-1997 Harry Carey would always led the Wrigley Field in his rendition of "Take me out to the Ballgame" After his passing in 1998 the Cubs decide to keep the tradition alive with celebrities and fans filling the role of Harry Caray as song leader.

The Flags:
Following every home win at Wrigley Field the Cubs fly a white flag with a blue W, and following losses they use a blue flag with a white L.

Immortalized Forever:
The Cubs Double Play combination of Joe Tinker, Johnny Evers, and Frank Chance would become the most famous double play combination in Major League history thanks to this poem by a New York Times writer Franklin Pierce:  "These are the saddest of possible words ... Tinker to Evers to Chance ... A trio of bear Cubs and fleeter than birds ... Tinker to Evers to Chance ... Ruthlessly pricking our gonfalon bubble ... Making a Giant hit into a double ... Words that are weighty with nothing but trouble ... Tinker to Evers to Chance."
 
 
On The Farm:
AAA: Iowa Cubs
AA: Tennessee Smokies
A: Daytona Cubs
A:  Kane County Cougars
A: Boise Hawks
R: Arizona League Cubs
©MMXIV Tank Productions. Stats researched by Frank Fleming, all information, statistics, logos, and team names are property of Major League Baseball.  This site is not affiliated with the Chicago Cubs or MLB.  This site is maintained for research purposes only.All logos used on this page were from Chris Creamer's Sports Logos Page.
Page created on March 7, 2001. Last updated on May 7, 2014 at 10:25 pm ET. 

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National League Team Index

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Played As:
Chicago White Stockings 1876- 1893
Chicago Colts 1894-1897
Chicago Orphans 1898-1901
Chicago Cubs 1902-Present
Historical Moments:

1876: The Chicago White Stockings become one of eight charter members of the National League led by their president William A. Hulbert, who was also the owner of the Chicago team. A.G. Spalding is the manager when the team plays its first game in the history of the Chicago National League Ball Club that takes place on April 25. Spalding doubles as the pitcher and records the first NL shutout, a 4-0 win over Louisville. The first run in team history is scored by center fielder Paul Hines on a throwing error in the second inning. The White Stockings go on to win the inaugural National League Championship with a 52-14 record.

1877:
The loss of several key players from the Championship team, contributes to the White Stockings dropping to fifth Place with a 26-33 record.

1878
:
The White Stockings finish in fourth place with a record of 30-30 record.

1879: The White Stockings get off to a terrible 5-12 start when their star player Cap Anson assumes the managerial duties away from Silver Flint. Under Anson the White Stockings would play much better winning 41 of 62 games on the way to a 4th place finish with a 46-33 record.

1880
:
The White Stockings dominate the NL winning 67 of 84 games and to capture the League's Championship by 15 games.

1881:
The White Stockings cruise to their second straight NL Championship with a 56-28 record winning comfortably by nine games.

1882:
The White Stockings become the first team to win three straight National League Championships with a record of 55-29, holding off the Providence Grays by four games.

1883: The White Stockings, who finish with a 59-35 record, see their championship reign ends, as the Boston Red Stockings beat them out by four games.

1884:
Ned Williamson becomes the first player to hit three home runs in a single game, against the Detroit Wolverines. However, the White Stockings finish a distant fourth with a 62-50 record.

1885:
The White Stockings win their fifth National League Pennant in the ten-year history of the National League holding off the New York Giants by two games, with an 87-25 record. The White Stocking would go on to play in an early version of the World Series against the rival American Association's St. Louis Brown Stockings, the two teams would split six games and tie another.

1886:
The White Stockings win the National League Championship again with a 90-34 record, and would go on to play in the thirrd version of the 19th century World Series losing four of six games to the American Association's St. Louis Brown Stockings.

1887: The White Stockings drive for a third Straight NL Championship ends in disappointment, as the club finishes third with a 71-50 record, six and half games out of first.

1888:
The White Stockings continue to be among the best teams in the National League as they finish in second place with a solid 77-58 record.

1889:
The White Stockings slip a little in the standings finishing in third place with a mediocre 67-65 record.

1890:
The White Stockings rebound off a mediocre season and challenge all season for first place falling just six games short with a record of 84-53.

1891:
The White Stockings battle down to the final week of the season before ending up three and half games short of first place with a record of 82-53.

1892:
The NL experiments with a split season as the White Stockings are non factor in either race finishing with a disappointing combined record of 70-76.

1893:
The White Stockings struggles continue as they finish in ninth place with a poor record of 56-71.

1894:
The team changes its nickname to Colts, as their struggles continue during an awful 57-75 season.

1895:
After fourth straight losing seasons the Colts end their struggles by finishing in fourth place with a 72-58 record.

1896:
The Colts are a non factor in the race for first place as they put up a solid 71-57 record while finishing in fifth place.

1897:
During a June 29th game against Louisville the Colts exploded for 36 runs setting a new Major League Record. However the 36-run explosion ends up being the sole highlight of a 59-73 season that also sees Cap Anson, who is regarded as the greatest player of the 19th Century retires at the age of 45. Anson whose playing career began in the old National Association in 1871 also filled the role of manager for a large chuck of his playing career. 

1898
:
Without Anson to guide them the team is dubbed the Orphans by the Chicago Papers. The Orphans end up doing all right fending for themselves finishing with an 85-65 record.

1899: The Orphans finish in eightth place, despite posting a winning record of 75-73.

1900:
The Orphans start the 20th Century on the wrong foot finishing in fifth place with a record of 65-75.

1901:
The Orphans struggle again falling to sixth place with a miserable record of 53-86.

1902
:
The Chicago Daily News becomes first-known entity to pen "Cubs" nickname as the team's moniker. The nickname refers to the amount of young players the team has. On September 15 three of those young players Joe Tinker, Johnny Evers, and Frank Chance record its first double play in 6-3 win vs. Reds. The young Cubs would go on to finish in fifth place with a 68-69 record.

1903:
The young Cubs begin to show some promise as they are in the race all season before finishing eight games out of first while placing third with a record of 82-56.

1904:
The Cubs continue to improve as they finish in second Place with a solid record of 93-60.

1905:
The Cubs continue to be on the fringe of greatness as they finish in third place with a solid record of 92-61.

1906:
The Cubs win a Major League record 116 games, enroot to taking the National League Championship by a comfortable 20 games. The Cubs would advance to the World Series where they would take on the cross-town White Sox. Alternating games between the Westside home of the Cubs, and the Southside home of the Sox, the Cubs are upset by a weak hitting White Sox team dubbed "The hitless wonders", by the Chicago papers. Neither team won a home game until the White Sox closed out the series in the sixth game with an 8-3 win.

1907:
The Cubs win 110 games on the way to cruising to their second straight World Series appearance. This time the Cubs World Series opponent was the Detroit Tigers, who were led by a young Ty Cobb. Trailing 3-2 in Game 1 the Cubs would rally to send the game to extra innings where darkness eventually prevailed, as the clubs walked away with a 3-3 tie. From there it would be a cake walk for the Cubs, as the team from Chicago went on to sweep the next four games holding the Tigers to a combined three runs.

1908:
In one of baseball's classic pennant races the New York Giants, Pittsburgh Pirates and Chicago Cubs battle down to the finals days of the season with National League Championship up for grabs. The Giants appear to win the pennant when Fred Merkle gets a dramatic game winning hit against the Cubs. However, due to fans flooding the field, Merkle is unable to circle the bases. A fiasco ensues where the Cubs try to tag 2nd Base with every baseball they could find. Not knowing what to do the National League decides to re-play the game with the Cubs winning the game which would end up deciding the pennant. With a 99-65 record the Cubs finished one game ahead of the Giants and Pirates.  The Cubs would go on to face the Detroit Tigers for the second Straight years in the World Series. Trailing 6-5 in the opener the Cubs would rally on six straight hits to claim a 10-6 victory. Game 2 would be a pitcher's duel until the 8th Inning before the Cubs exploded for six runs to take a 2-0 series lead. After the Tigers won Game 3, the Cubs would win the final two games shutting out the Tigers twice to become the first team ever to win two consecutive World Series. Little did anyone know at the time that this would be the last World Series the Cubs would win.

1909:
Despite finishing with a 104-49 record, the Cubs Championship reign ends as the Pittsburgh Pirates beat out the Cubs by six and half games. 

1910:
The Cubs win their fourth National League pennant in five seasons, wining 104 games and capturing the flag by 13 games. However, the Cubs would fall quickly in the World Series losing four straight to the Philadelphia Athletics.

1911:
Heinie Zimmerman tallies a Cubs record nine RBI in 20-2 win against the Boston Braves. The Cubs would go on to finish in second Place with a 92-62 record.

1912:
The Cubs slip to tihrd place but surpass 90 wins again posting a record of 91-59.

1913:
Johnny Evers takes over as manager from Franck Chance as the Cubs finish in third place again, despite a solid 88-65 record.

1914:
The Cubs continue to slide in the standings as they finish in fourth place with a mediocre 78-76 record.

1915:
Zip Zabel pitches a record 18.1 relief innings in a 19-inning 4-3 win over the Brooklyn Robins. However the Cubs would go on to finish in fifth Place with a disappointing 73-80 record. 

1916:
Charles Weeghman and nine investors purchase the Cubs from Charles Taft. Three months later, on April 20th, the Cubs beat the Reds, 7-6, in the first National League game at Weeghman Park, which would later be renamed Cubs Park in 1920 and eventually Wrigley Field in 1926. The Cubs first season at Clark and Addison streets would not be a good one as the team finished in fifth with a 67-86 record.

1917
:
The Cubs Hippo Vaughn combines with the Reds Fred Toney for baseball's only 9-inning double no-hit game, eventually the game is won by the Cincinnati Reds 1-0 in tenth inning. The Cubs would go on to post their third straight losing season as they finish in fifth pace with a record of 74-80.

1918:
With an 84-45 record, the Cubs win the NL pennant by ten and half games. In the aftermath of the United States' entry into World War I in 1917, a government edict called for the end of major league baseball's 1918 regular season by Labor Day with the playing of the World Series immediately thereafter. Accordingly, the 1918 Series was a late-summer classic that ran from September 5th through September 11th. After being shutdown by Babe Ruth and the Boston Red Sox the Cubs bounced back to win Game 2 behind the pitching of Lefty Tyler. After the Sox claimed Game 3, the Cubs fell behind 3-1 in the series as Babe Ruth was a one-man wrecking crew in a 3-2 victory in Game 4, as Ruth batted sixth and delivered the big hit, a two-run triple in the fourth inning. The Cubs would win Game 5, but the Sox would go on to claim the series in six games.

1919: The Cubs finish in third place as they post a respectable record of 75-65.

1920: After two straight solid seasons the Cubs struggle all season on the way to finishing in fifth place with a record of 75-79.

1921:
The Cubs struggle all season and finish in seventh place with a horrid record of 64-89.

1922:
The Cubs post a winning record of 80-74 but finish in the middle of the pack in the National League again.

1923:
The Cubs improve slightly as they finish in fourth place with a record of 83-71.

1924:
The Cubs continue to remain on the fringe of the pennant race as they finish in fourth place again with a record of 81-72.

1925:
On April 14th with Quin Ryan at the microphone WGN Radio broadcasts its first regular-season Cubs game, as Chicago defeats the Pittsburgh Pirates by 8-2. However, the season would not be as successful as the Cubs fell into last place with a 68-86 record.

1926:
The Cubs rebound off their last pace season by climbing back to fourth place with a record of 82-72.

1927:
A second deck is added to Wrigley Field increasing capacity to 40,000, as the Cubs draw over a million fans for the first time ever. The Cubs would go on to finish in fourth place with a solid 85-68 record.

1928:
The Cubs are part of an exciting three team race for the National League Pennant. The Cubs would end up finishing four games out of first place in third with a 91-63 record.

1929: After falling fourgames short in 1928 the Cubs would not be denied in 1929, with a 98-54 record the Cubs win the National League pennant by more than ten games, as nearly 1.5 million people pack Wrigley Field to marvel at the hitting exploits of future Hall of Famers Rogers Hornsby (the year's NL MVP), Hack Wilson, Gabby Hartnett and Kiki Cuyler. In the first World Series played at Wrigley Field the Cubs faced the Philadelphia Athletics. After losing the first two games at home the Cubs rebounded to take Game 3 in Philadelphia and looked well on their way to evening the series at 2 with an 8-0 lead in Game 4. However, the A's would rally and would stun the Cubs by scoring ten runs in the 7th Inning to take a commanding 3-1 series lead. The Cubs would not recover losing Game 5 to close out the series.

1930:
Outfielder Hack Wilson puts together one of the greatest hitting seasons in baseball history, pounding 56 homers and driving in a single season record 191 RBI. However, the Cubs would fall two games short of their quest for a return trip to the World Series with a 90-64 record.

1931:
The Cubs continue to be one of the top teams in the national League as they finish in third place with a solid record of 84-70.

1932:
In the same year the Cubs become the final Major League team to add numbers to their uniforms, manager Charlie Grimm leads the Cubs to the National League pennant with a 90-64 record. The Cubs face the vaunted New York Yankees in the World Series, and would end up being swept in four straight games. However, one moment stands as one of the biggest debates in World Series history. Did Babe Ruth call his shot? In the 5th inning of Game 3 at Wrigley Field, the Babe seemed to gesture to CF before smashing a majestic homer over the CF wall. While the debate on weather he called his shot will range on forever, it just served to build on the Babe's legend.

1933:
The Cubs attempt for a return trip to the Fall Classic ends in vein with an 86-68 record only good for third place in the NL.

1934:
The Cubs fall eight games short of the World Series as they finish in third place with a solid record of 86-65.

1935
:
The Cubs use an incredible 21-game winning streak to overtake the St. Louis Cardinals for the NL Pennant with a 100-54 record. In the World Series the Cubs would face the Detroit Tigers. After winning Game 1 the Cubs, would see the Tigers take the next 3 even after losing star 1B Hank Greenberg with a broken wrist. After the Cubs won Game 5 to send the series back to Detroit. With the game tied 3-3 in the ninth inning of Game 6 Hack Wilson led off with a triple, but Tigers pitching would freeze him there, and would go on to win the game and the series in the bottom of the ninth.

1936:
The Cubs fall just five games short in their quest to get back in the World Series as they post a record of 87-67 while finishing in second place.

1937:
Bill Veeck is hired and plants the now famous ivy on the outfield wall. That same year, the bleachers are constructed and a new scoreboard is installed, both of which remained untouched for years. The Cubs would go on to finish three games out of first with a 93-61 record.

1938:
One of the most dramatic moments in team history occurs when catcher-manager Gabby Hartnett hits the legendary "Homer in the Gloamin" at Wrigley Field. Hartnett's round-tripper off Pittsburgh Pirate Mace Brown in a near dark Wrigley Field gives the Cubs their third NL pennant of the decade with an 89-63 record. However, the Cubs would be overmatched in the World Series as they were swept by the New York Yankees for the seocnd time in six years.

1939
:
The Cubs close out a successful decade by finishing in fourth place with a solid record of 84-70.

1940:
The Cubs see a string of 14 straight winning seasons come to an end as they finish in fifth pace with a record of 75-79.

1941: The Cubs finish in sixth pace with a record of 70-84. Following the season the Cubs begin plans to add light to Wrigley Field. However, after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, P.K. Wrigley donates the lighting equipment that he had recently purchased to the War Department, as a result Wrigley Field would not see lights added for another 47 years.

1942:
The Cubs struggles continue as they post their third straight losing season finishing in sixth place with a record of 68-86.

1943:
With a number of baseball's top stars fighting in World War II the Cubs continue to struggle as they finish in fifth place with a record of 74-79.

1944:
The Cubs get off to a miserable start losing nine of their first ten games when Manager Jimmie Wilson is fired. Under new Manager Charlie Grimm the Cubs would finish the season strong posting a 75-78 record on the season.

1945:
The Cubs make their final World Series appearance of the 20th century by posting a 98-56 record. In the World Series the Cubs would face the Detroit Tigers for the 4th times. The Cubs get off to a promising start when Hank Borowy pitches the Cubs to a 9-0 shutout win in Game 1. The Tigers would bounce back to take Game 2, as the series shifted to Wrigley. The Cubs would use another standout pitching performance as Claude Passeau tossed a one-hitter in Game 3 to retake the series lead. During their Game 3 win local tavern owner Billy Sianis was asked to leave because his pet goat's odor was bothering other fans. Sianis declares the Cubs would not win again. The Tigers would win the next two games, as the Cubs faced a 3-2 series deficit heading back to Detroit. In Game 6 OF Stan Hack reaches safely in six of seven plate appearances, while driving in the winning run in 12th inning as Cubs beat Tigers 8-7 to force Game 7. However the Cubs would fall losing 9-3 in what would be their final World Series game of the century.

1946:
The Cubs follow up their trip to the World Series by finishing in third place with a solid record of 82-71.

1947:
On May 18th the largest crown in Wrigley Field history comes to see Jackie Robinson's first game in Chicago. The Cubs would lose to Robinson's Brooklyn Dodgers 4-2. The Cubs would go on to finish sixth place that season with a 69-85 record.

1948
:
A preseason exhibition game against the cross-town White Sox on April 16th is the setting for the Cubs debut on WGN-TV, as Jack Brickhouse broadcasts a 4-1 White Sox win at Wrigley Field. The Cubs would go on to finish in last place with a 64-90 record.

1949:
The Cubs finish in last pace for the second straight season as they post a record of 61-93.

1950: The Cubs struggles continue as they finish in seventh place with a record of 64-89.

1951:
The Cubs finish in last place for the third time in four years as they post a miserable 62-92 record.

1952:
Hank Sauer wins the NL Most Valuable Player award after he hit a major league leading 37 home runs with 121 RBI. With Sauer's help the Cubs climb out of the cellar and finish fifth with a 77-77 record.

1953:
In a season that sees the debut of Ernie Banks the Cubs fall to seventh place with a 65-89 record.

1954:
The Cubs continue to wallow in the second division as they finish in seventh place with a record of 64-90.

1955:
On May 12th Sam Jones closes out a no hitter in dramatic fashion by walking the first three batters of the ninth inning to load the bases before striking out the side. However, success does not come often for the Cubs who finish in sixth place with a 63-81 record.

1956:
The Cubs end up back in the basement as they post a terrible record of 60-94.

1957:
Rookie Dick Drott strikes out 15 Milwaukee Braves including famed slugger Hank Aaron three times-in a 7-5 win. However the Cubs would go on to finish with an awful 62-92 record that would have them tied for the NL's worst record.

1958:
Ernie Banks wins the NL MVP hitting 47 homers, while driving in 129 runs. However, the Cubs still struggle and finish in fifth place tie with a 72-82 record.

1959:
Ernie Banks becomes the first National Leaguer to win the MVP trophy in back-to-back seasons as he hits 45 home runs and a major-league leading 143 RBI. However, once again the Cubs finish in a fifth place tie with a 74-80 record.

1960:
The Cubs struggles continue into a new decade as they finish in seventh place with a miserable record of 60-94.

1961:
Owner P.K. Wrigley experimented with manager position, implementing a "College of Coaches." The system was meant to be a blending of ideas from several individuals instead of the traditional one skipper ended without success after just two seasons. The Cubs would finish in seventh place with a record of 64-90.

1962:
The "College of Coaches" experiment is abandoned after two failed seasons as the Cubs end up with a horrific 9th Place 59-103 season, finishing worse then the expansion Houston Colt .45s. However, not all news is grim for the Cubs as 2B Ken Hubbs takes home Rookie of the Year honors.

1963:
With Bob Kennedy hired as the sole manager of the Cubs the team shows marked improvement finishing with an 82-80 record, a mere 23-game improvement over the previous season.

1964:
Tragedy strikes the Cubs when promising young 2B Ken Hubbs is killed when the plane is piloting crashes into a mountain in Utah before the start of the season in which the Cubs took a step backward finish with a 76-86 record.

1965:
The Cubs slide into eighth place with a record of 72-90 record.

1966:
Following an eightth place Leo Durocher is hired as manager, and states, "The Cubs are not an eighth place team." Durocher is right as the Cubs fall into the NL Cellar with an awful 59-103 record. 

1967:
After an awful first season Leo Durocher final gets the Cubs to play his type of baseball, as the Cubs experience an impressive 28-game improvement on the way to a third Place 87-74 season.

1968:
The Cubs continue to show some promise as they finish in third place with a respectable record of 84-78.

1969:
Weather or not you are suppositious and believe in curses like a black cat you must admit what happened to the Cubs is an awful strange coincidence. After leading the NL East all summer the Cubs entered a key a two-game series at Shea Stadium leading the Mets by two and half on September 9th. During that first game a black cat came out of nowhere and circled the Ron Santo in the on deck circle before pacing back and forth on the top step of the Cubs dugout. The Cat would eventually take off down the tunnel leading to Cubs clubhouse. The Cubs would not recover eventually finishing eight games out first place with a 92-70 record.

1970:
Mr. Cub Ernie Banks belts his 500th career HR, as the Cubs fall five games short of first place with an 84-78 record.

1971:
Ernie Banks retires following his 19th season in a Cubs uniform, through his career Mr. Cub blasted 512 career HR, but never was fortunate to play in the postseason. In his final season the Cubs finish in a third place tie with an 83-79 record.

1972:
Two No Hitters one by Burt Hooton on April 16th and one by Milt Pappas September 2nd highlight a second place 85-77 season. During the season Leo Durocher is fired after trouble with players and management boiled over, and began affecting the team's play.

1973:
In wacky season in which the entire National League East struggles to play .500 baseball the Cubs finish just five games out of first despite a record of 77-84.

1974:
After the departure of Ferguson Jenkins the Cubs sink back into the cellar, while posting a terrible 66-96 record.

1975:
The sole highlight of an otherwise forgettable 75-87 season comes on August 21st when Rick and Paul Reuschel become first brothers to combine on shutout in Cubs' 7-0 win over the Los Angeles Dodgers.

1976:
In the year of the Bi-Centennial nobody is more patriotic then Rick Monday, who rescues an American flag from two protesters attempting to burn nation's symbol in centerfield at Dodger Stadium. The Cubs would go on to repeat their 75-87 finish of the previous year, despite the efforts of Bill Madlock who wins the batting title by going 4-for-4 on the final day of the season.

1977:
The Cubs get off to a fast start, and spend most of the first half of the season in first place. However, in the second half the Cubs falter, as they end the season with a mediocre 81-81 record.

1978: The Cubs would again hover on the fringe of the pennant race as they finish just 11 games out of first place despite only posting a record of 79-83.

1979:
Bruce Sutter establishes himself as baseball's most dominant closer by taking home the NL Cy Young award. However, Sutter does not take the Cubs far as they finish in fifth place with an 80-82 record.

1980:
Following a miserable last place 64-98 season ace close Bruce Sutter is traded to the St. Louis Cardinals for Leon Durham.

1981:
In the midst of a terrible season interrupted by a two month strike, in which the Cubs finish with an NL worst 38-65 combined record, the Cubs are sold by William Wrigley to the Tribune Company for $20.5 million.

1982: Ferguson Jenkins returns to the Cubs and becomes the seventh pitcher to eclipses the 3,000 strikeout. However, the Cubs only manage to finish in fifth place with a 73-89 record.

1983:
The frustration for the Cubs boils over when Manager Lee Elia unleashes a profanity laced tirade aimed at the fans known as "Bleacher Bums" who fill the seats in the outfield during the day at Wrigley Field following an April 29th loss to the Los Angeles Dodgers. Elia would be replaced by Charlie Fox the rest of the season as the Cubs finish in fifth place with a record of 71-91.

1984:
On June 23rd Ryne Sandberg goes five-for-six and hits two late-inning game-tying home runs off St. Louis Cardinals reliever Bruce Sutter in a thrilling Cubs 11-inning 12-11 win. Sandberg would go on to win the National League MVP. Meanwhile Rick Suttcliffe who was acquired in a mid-June deal with the Cleveland Indians posts a 16-1 record on the way to claiming the Cy Young. Together Suttcliffe, ad Sandberg lead the Cubs to their first NL Eastern Division championship with a 96-65 record. In the Cubs first postseason appearance since 1945 the Cubs face the San Diego Padres in the NLCS. The Cubs would get off to a fast start demolishing the Padres in Game 1 at Wrigley Field 13-0. The Cubs would follow it up with 4-2 win in Game 2, which would send them to San Diego only needing to win just one game to advance to the World Series. In San Diego the Cubs would hold leads in all three games, but the bullpen could not hold it as the Padres won three straight to advance to the World Series. Some heartbreaking moments came in Game 4 when Steve Garvey hit a walk off home run, while Leon Durham's error in Game 5 opened the flood gates.

1985:
The Cubs are not able to repeat their magic as they fall to fourth place with a 77-84 record, as injuries take their toll all season long.

1986:
The Cubs continue to slide in the standings as they fall to fifth place with a record of 70-90, as Gene Michael replace Jim Frey as Manager in the middle of the season.

1987:
The Cubs make a big splash by signing free agent All-Star OF Andre Dawson away from the Montreal Expos. Dawson would go on to lead the National League in Home Runs with 49, taking home the MVP despite the Cubs finishing in last place with a 76-85 record.

1988:
On August 8th, in a contest against the Philadelphia Phillies, the Cubs play the first night game in Wrigley Field history, as number one Cubs fan; President Ronald Regan throws the switch from the White House. However, the night's debut was eventually rained out after three and half innings, as the first official night game occurred the next night, when the Cubs defeated the New York Mets 6-4. The Cubs would go on to finish the season in fourth place with a record of 77-85.

1989: Led by Manager Don Zimmer, the Cubs enjoyed All-Star seasons from Ryne Sandberg, Andre Dawson, and Rick Sutcliffe. In addition the Cubs enjoyed strong relief from closer Mitch Williams, who earned the name "Wild Thing" for his walk filled relief appearances. With these key contributions the Cubs win the NL East with a 93-69 record. However the Cubs would go on to lose in the NLCS again falling victim to the hitting of Will Clark as the San Francisco Giants defeated the Cubs s four games to one.

1990:
The Cubs come back to earth finishing in a fourth place tie with a disappointing 77-85 record, in a year in which Wrigley Field hosts the All-Star Game.

1991:
Manager Don Zimmer is replaced by Jim Essian as the Cubs struggle again to finish in fourth place with a 77-83 record.

1992:
Near the end of spring training the Cubs make a deal with White Sox swapping George Bell, for Sammy Sosa. In Sosa's first season with Cubs the team finishes in fourth place with a 78-84 record.

1993:
Despite ending a string of four straight losing season manger Jim Lefbevre is fired after a fourth place season in which the Cubs finish 84-78.

1994:
Karl "Tuffy" Rhodes hits three Homer Runs during an opening day loss to the Mets. The Cubs would be stunned a few weeks later when star 2B Ryne Sandberg suddenly retires in an attempt to save a failing marriage. Without Sandberg the Cubs would be in last place in the newly formed National League Central with a 49-64 record when the season is ended on August 12th because of a player's strike.

1995:
The Cubs emerge form the strike under new Management as third generation General Manager Andy MacPhail takes over as president of the Cubs. In the first year of the MacPhail era the Cubs finish in third place with a record of 73-71.

1996:
Ryne Sandberg returns after a nearly two year hiatus in an attempt to set the career record for Homer Runs among second baseman, as the Cubs finish in fourth place with a 76-86 record.

1997:
The Cubs stumble out of the gate losing their first 16 games as closer Mel Rojas, the Cubs big off-season acquisition becomes one of the biggest free agent busts of all-time. Rojas would end up being dealt to the New York Mets in August, as the Cubs went on to finish in last place with a 68-94 record. Following the season Ryne Sandberg would retire for good holding the record for homer among second baseman.

1998:
On May 6th Rookie Pitcher Kerry Wood ties a major-league record by fanning 20 batters in a 2-0 win over the Houston Astros. Wood would go on to win the Rookie of the Year, but it was overshadowed by the story of the year. That story would involve Cubs OF Sammy Sosa, and St. Louis Cardinals 1B Mark McGwire battle all season for the single season Home Run record held by Roger Maris. On September 13th in a ten inning 11-10 win against the Milwaukee Brewers, Sosa hits home runs Nos. 61 and 62 to tie and then surpass Roger Maris on single-season home run list. Sosa would eventually end up with 66 HR leaving him just four behind McGwire for the record.  Thanks to Sosa who claims the National League MVP the Cubs end the season tied with San Francisco Giants for the Wild Card with a record of 89-73.  The Cubs would capture that wild card spot with a 5-3 win over the Giants in one-game playoff at Wrigley Field. However, the Cubs would go on to be swept in three straight games by the Atlanta Braves in the NLDS.

1999:
On his way to winning the first Hank Aaron award for slugging, Sammy Sosa becomes the first player to hit 60 Home Runs in two consecutive seasons. However, as he did in 1998 he would finish second to Mark McGwire for the NL lead. The Cubs would go on to fall back into last place with a 67-95 record, as the Cubs sorely missed Kerry Wood who missed the entire season with an arm injury.

2000:
The Cubs face the New York Mets at the start of the season with a two game series in Tokyo, Japan. The Cubs would win the first game of the series, as the two teams split the series. Sammy Sosa would go on to lead the National League in Home Runs with 50. However, the Cubs finished in last place again with a 65-97 record.

2001:
Sammy Sosa tags 425 total bases for his second 400-plus campaign, setting club marks for extra-base hits (103) and slugging percentage (737), topping the records set by Hack Wilson. In addition, Sosa recorded just the seventh 50-homer/150 RBI season in Major League history, becoming the only player since World War II to accomplish this feat twice, having previously reached it in 1998 as well. The Cubs would get strong pitching in the early part of the season highlighted by back-to-back one-hitters from John Lieber who goes on to win 20 games, and Kerry Wood on May 24th and 25th. Thanks to the pitching staff and Sosa the Cubs are in first Place until late August. However the Cubs would end up fading in September finishing in third place behind the playoff bound Houston Astros and St. Louis Cardinals with a solid 88-74 record.

2002:
After contending for the National League Central, hopes were high for the Cubs entering the season. However, early on it was clear the Cubs were going to be a disappointment as they found themselves well below .500 all season, while struggling to score runs. Making matters worse the Cubs started to take controversial measures, including putting up dark netting over the fence in back of the bleachers, to prevent fans from watching the game at the apartment buildings surrounding Wrigley Field. As midseason approached Manager Don Baylor was singled out as the scapegoat. However, under his replacement Bruce Kimm the Cubs would not do any better finishing in 5th place with an awful 67-95 record. The only thing Cubs had to look forward to was the debut of rookie pitcher Mark Prior, who goes 6-6 in 19 starts. Following the season the Cubs would change managers again, hiring Dusty Baker who had just led the San Francisco Giants to the World Series.

2003:
The Cubs began the season on a milestone watch, as Sammy Sosa needed just one long ball to achieve his 500th career Homer. Sosa would achieve the feat on the 4th day of the season going deep on the road in the Cincinnati Reds new ballpark. However Sosa struggled early and in May was placed on the disabled list. Despite the loss of Sosa the Cubs played solid baseball behind the terrific one-two punch of Kerry Wood and Mark Prior who were quickly establishing themselves as the best pitching combo in the NL. When Sosa returned from the Disabled List he was still struggling so he tried to use a corked bat to get himself out of his slump. Instead in brought embarrassment as his bat broke in a June 3rd interleague game against the Tampa Bay Devil Rays spreading cork all over the field, and earning the star an eight game suspension. After the suspension Sosa caught fire and overcame his early power struggles to end the season with 40 homers, and 103 RBI. The Cubs however would spend much of the next 2 months hovering around .500. Hoping to get back in the race the Cubs made several deals with the Pittsburgh Pirates acquiring Armais Ramirez, Kenny Lofton, and Randall Simon, which helped kick start the Cubs offense. Despite a mediocre 69-66 record entering September the Cubs were in thick of a three-team race for the NL Central Division title. The Cubs would establish themselves as a serious contender by taking four out of five from the St. Louis Cardinals to begin the season's last month. It would kick start a 19-8 month as the Cubs pitching and improved offense were just enough to catapult them into first place where they won the first division title in 14 years with an 88-74 record. Facing the Atlanta Braves in the NLDS the Cubs got off to a good start as Kerry Wood stared on the mound and at the plate pitching a solid seven plus innings while delivering a two-run double as the Cubs won Game 1 in Atlanta 4-2. After the Braves took Game 2 the series shifted to Wrigley Field where Mark Prior out dueled Greg Maddux to give the Cubs a 3-1 win. However with a chance to close the series out in Game 4 Matt Clement struggled as the Braves evened the series with a 6-4 win setting up a decisive fifth game in Atlanta. Game 5 in Atlanta would see the return of Kerry Wood who dominated the Braves again as the Cubs won their first postseason series in 95 years with a 5-1 win. Facing the Florida Marlins in the NLCS the Cubs experienced a roller coaster of emotions in Game 1, as they jumped out to a quick 4-0 lead. However the Marlins rallied and took a lead into the 9th where Sammy Sosa delivered a two-out two-run homer to even the game at 8-8. However, the Marlins would recover and win in the 11th inning. The loss would not deter the Cubs who came back the next night and won going away 12-3, as they took the next three games for a 3-1 series lead. After losing Game 5 in Florida the Cubs returned to Wrigley Field needing just one win to reach their first World Series since 1945. A party atmosphere was hovering over Wrigleyville as the Cubs had Mark Prior on the mound and a 3-0 lead going into the 8th Inning. The cheers got louder as Mike Mordecai flied out to start the inning. After a Juan Pierre double the Cubs appeared to have the innings second out as Moises Alou drifted to the stands, but a fan named Steve Bartman knocked the ball away, opening the flood gates. The batter Luis Castillo would walk, which was followed by an Ivan Rodriguez single that put the Marlins on the board. Things would only get worse as SS Alex Gonzalez booted a double play ball as the Marlins went on to score eight runs to force a 7th game with an 8-3 win. Not even Kerry Wood could save the Cubs in Game 7 as the Cubs ace was shaky as the Marlins took the game by a score of 9-6 to go on to the World Series leaving Cubs fans with heartbreak like they had never suffered before.

2004:
Coming off their heartbreaking loss in the NLCS the Cubs were the popular pick to win the NL at the start of the season as their dynamic young pitching duo of Kerry Wood and Mark Prior was joined by future Hall of Famer Greg Maddux who was returning to the Cubs after 11 years with Atlanta Braves. The Cubs would get off to a solid start winning 12 of their first 18 games. However, as the season wore on the Cubs had issues with injuries as both Wood and Prior missed significant time due to injury making only a total of 43 starts, with neither winning 10 games. Picking up the slack for Wood and Prior was Maddux and Carlos Zambrano who each won a team high 16 games, included was Maddux's 300th career win against the San Francisco Giants on August 7th. While the Cubs were well out of the picture for the Division Title they remained in the Wild Card race until the end of the season. However with a week left in the season the Cubs bullpen failed them as protecting a 3-0  lead against the New York Mets with two outs in the ninth Inning Closer LaTroy Hawkins allowed a three run homer to September call up Victor Diaz. The Mets would go on to win in 11 innings as another minor league call up Craig Brazell won the game with a homer. The Cubs would not recover as they lost seven of their final nine games, missing the Wild Card spot by just three games as they finished in third place with an 89-73 record. On the final game of the season a simmering feud between Sammy Sosa and Manager Dusty Baker exploded as Sosa left early and was criticized heavily by Baker. Immediately trade rumors began to emerge as Sosa who despite hitting 35 Home Runs only managed 80 RBI while hitting .253, with a poor average in clutch situations. Eventually Sosa would be dealt to the Baltimore Orioles for Jerry Hairston Jr. and at least two minor-leaguers.

2005
:
From the start of the season Mark Prior and Kerry Wood dealt with nagging arm injuries that would limit them to just 37 total starts, as the Cubs play mediocre baseball all year, on the way to a disappointing 79-83 record that saw them land in 4th place. Despite not being in the playoff picture all year there still were several bright spots as 1B Derek Lee had a breakout year leading all three triple crown categories for much of the first half. Lee would manage to win the batting crown with a .335 average while his 46 homers ranked second in NL. However with few people on base in the second half he fell out of the top ten and ended with 107 RBI. Also having a solid offensive season was 3B Aramis Ramirez who hit .302 with 31 homers and 93 RBI. However, Nomar Garicaparra continued to struggle with injuries as a torn groan limited him to just 62 games, as the Cubs decided to let him walk away as a Free Agent at the end of the season.

2006
:
The Cubs started the season as injuries continued and Mark Prior, as the two one time aces would hardly pitch making just 13 appearances combines, with Prior posting a 1-6 record with a robust 7.21 ERA. Despite the problems of Wood and Prior the Cubs got often to a decent start, winning 12 of their first 19 games. However, when Derek Lee suffered a fractured wrist in a collision with Rafael Furcal of the Los Angeles Dodgers on April 20th the Cubs offense suddenly lost its punch. While Lee would be limited to just 50 games the Cubs plunged quickly winning just 5 of 28 games leading into Memorial Day, as the Cubs embarked on another season to forget. As the season wore on frustrations in Chicago mounted as the Cubs set records for no shows at Wrigley Field. One night Cubs fans rather forget is a Sunday Night National TV game against the New York Mets in July, in which the Cubs allowed two Grand Slams in an 11-run 6th leading to fans showering the field with debris. It was one of several incidents of fans throwing garbage during the season. By the time the season was over Manager Dusty Baker who entered 2003 as a hero, had become public enemy number one as fans booed him every time he changed pitchers. The Cubs would end the season in last place with a terrible record of 66-96, as Baker was fired and replaced by Lou Piniella, who immediately became the source of the new hope for Cubs fans. With the hiring of Piniella the Cubs would also go on a wild off-season spending spree signing Alfonso Soriano seen by many as the top Free Agent following a 40-40 season with the Washington Nationals. In addition the Cubs signed Free Agent Pitchers Ted Lilly and Jason Marquis with the hopes of building a rotation they could count on beyond Carlos Zambrano.

2007
:
No matter how bleak the situation has been in the past the Cubs always begin the season full of optimism. A good reason for that optimism despite coming off a last place season was new Manager Lou Piniella and their big free agent signings. However, early on it was more of the same as the Cubs got off to a slow start losing six of their first nine games, as they posted a 10-14 record in April. In May the Cubs played a light better as they climbed above .500 on May 9th. However a week later the Cubs showed they still had a way to go as they blew a 5-1 lead in the ninth Inning against the New York Mets who were playing several reserves. The Cubs would rebound quickly as they took two of three against the cross-town White Sox. However, the Cubs still struggled the rest of the month and started June with a record of 22-30. As June began the Cubs looked like they were about to come apart at the seems as ace pitcher Carlos Zambrano and Catcher Michael Barrett got in a dugout shoving match as the Cubs were beaten by the Atlanta Braves 8-5. A day later it was Piniella blowing his top as he began kicking dirt and threw his cap after a close play at third base sent him out to argue with Umpire Mark Wegner. Piniella was suspended four games for the incident, but it seemed to light a fire under his team as the Cubs won 8 of their next 12 games. While problems still existed as Michael Barrett, who would end up being dealt to the San Diego Padres, was involved in another altercation this time with pitcher Rich Hill, the Cubs seemed to be turning the corner. As June was coming to a close the Cubs were playing solid baseball winning seven straight to approach .500 again as they swept a three game series with the White Sox on the South Side. After ending the first half with a record of 44-43, the Cubs began to make their move in the Central Division as they ended the month of July just a half game behind the first place Milwaukee Brewers as they posted a 17-9 record, including wins in 9 of their first 12 games after the All-Star Game. Despite a rough stretch in August, after losing Alfonso Soriano for a few weeks to an injury the Cubs entered September in the thick of the pennant race. Down the stretch it would be the Cubs led by their pitching staff that would end up getting the edge as they won 10 of 12 games during a key stretch in mid-September to take over first place. The Cubs would end up completing a worst-to0first turnaround as they won the NL Central with a record of 85-77, as they set a new attendance record of 3,252,462. In the NLDS the Cubs were matched up against the Arizona Diamondbacks. In Game 1 pitching was the story as Brandon Webb and Carlos Zambrano both had solid starts as the game was tied 1-1 after six innings. However, the Cubs bullpen would falter as the D-Backs won 3-1. After losing 8-4 in Game 2 the series shifted to Wrigley Field with the Cubs needing a win to avoid a sweep. Things did not start well as Chris Young homered on Rich Hill's first pitch. The Cubs would not be able to fight back as the Diamondbacks completed the three game sweep with a 5-1 win.

2008
:
Coming off a division championship there was renewed hope that the Cubs could finally break through and win a World Series, as they entered the 100th anniversary of their last title. Opening Day at Wrigley Field would see a pitcher's duel, as Carlos Zamrbano blanked the Milwaukee Brewers over six and two thirds innings. However, the Cubs were unable to break through against Ben Sheets, the Brewers starter. The Brewers finally dented the scoreboard in the ninth inning with three runs. However, the Cubs would answer back as Japanese import Kosuke Fukudome became an instant fan favorite with a game tying three run homer. While the Brewers still won the game 4-3, the Cubs were right on track to get off to a terrific start as they posted a 17-10 record over the first month of the season, and found themselves in a first place tie. The Cubs would continued their strong play in May, as Rookie Catcher Geovany Soto became a vital part of the line up, as he would make the All-Star team, and would go on to win Rookie of the Year honors with 23 home runs, and 86 RBI, as the Cubs held the best record in baseball over Memorial Day Weekend. The Cubs would continue to hold that honor until the All-Star Break, as they held a four and half game lead with a record of 57-38. Coming out of the All-Star Game the Cubs hit a road bump as they were caught by the Milwaukee Brewers, who spurred by the acquisition of C.C. Sabathia became the Cubs only obstacle to a return to the playoffs. On July 28th the Cubs entered a key four game series with those Brewers in Miller Park, leading the Central Division by one game. Facing Sabathia in the opener, the Cubs would rally against the Brewers bullpen for a 6-4 win, as they would go on to sweep the series, outscoring the Brewers over the final three games 25-7. The Cubs would not be challenged again as they cruised the rest of the way to a second straight division title. September would prove a month to remember in the early going for the Cubs, as they returned to Miller Park on September 14th for a game against the Houston Astros after Hurricane Ike forced the game to be moved out of Houston. There thousands of Cubs fans trekked north to see Carlos Zambrano make history, as he became the first Cubs pitcher in 36 years to throw a no hitter, as he blanked the obviously distracted Astros 5-0. Zambrano would be on the mound six days later as the Cubs clinched the division against the St. Louis Cardinals. However, a tired arm limited him down the stretch, as the Cubs posted a solid 97-64 record. In the NLDS the Cubs faced the Los Angeles Dodgers who ended the season, as one of the hottest teams in baseball. In Game 1, the Cubs got off to a fast start as Mark DeRosa hit a two run homer to give the Cubs an early lead. However, Ryan Dempster would lose home plate, before serving up a fifth inning grand slam to James Loney as the Dodgers took the opener 7-2. Game 2 would not go any better, as Carlos Zambrano struggled; while the Cubs defense unraveled with four errors, as the Dodgers took a 2-0 series lead with a 10-3 win. The Dodgers would go on to sweep the series with a 3-1 win in Game 3.

2009
:
Coming off two straight division titles that ended in bitter disappointment with sweeps in the NLDS the Cubs found themselves handcuffed during the free agency season as the Tribune Company looked to sell the team. At the same time they were finalizing a deal with the Ricketts' family the Cubs became the first team in MLB history to file for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy. Not only were the Cubs unable big to sign a bat to improve their offense, but they lost Kerry Wood and Mark DeRosa, who both signed deals with the Cleveland Indians. Early on things looked good for the Cubs, as they won eight of their first 12 games. However, they would drop seven of their next nine games establishing a pattern of inconsistency that would affect the Cubs all season. As every time it appeared they would make a run and get back in front of the Central Division, they would have a bad week and drop back to .500. July would see the Cubs make big gains, as they posted an 18-9 record, and took over the divisional lead on July 26th. However, after starting August in first place the Cubs again hit a bad stretch as season of injuries that saw nearly every key player miss time began to take its toll. The Cubs were also distracted by the continued erratic behavior or Milton Bradley, who was the Cubs biggest off-season acquisition and struggled all season while clashing with fans and Manager Lou Piniella. In August they would post a record of 11-17, and went from first place to ten and half games out of first place. The Cubs would recover and post a record of 17-12 in September, but it would be too late, as they finished in second place with a record of 83-78. While it did end in disappointment, it marked the first time since 1972, that the Cubs posted three straight winning seasons.

2010: With the Cubs ownership settled, they looked to rebound and reclaim the Central Division in the National League. However, signs that the Cubs would struggle were evident right from opening day as they were slammed by the Atlanta Braves 16-5. After posting a 2-4 record on the road, the Cubs played well in their home opener beating the Milwaukee Brewers 9-5, as they posted a mediocre 11-13 record in April. As May began the Cubs continued to struggle, looking for a spark they called up prospect Starlin Castro from AA Tennessee on May 7th. Castro, the first player born in the 1990's had a debut for the ages, with six RBI as the Cubs doubled up the Cincinnati Reds 14-7 on the road. However, despite the play of their rookie Shortstop, the Cubs continued to play lackluster baseball into June. On June 25th, the Cubs frustrations would boil over as temperamental pitcher Carlos Zambrano was suspended after a tirade in the dugout that led to a scuffle with 1B Derek Lee as the Cubs dropped to 32-41 with a loss to the Chicago White Sox on the South Side. The Cubs would enter the All-Star Break with a disappointing 39-50. Shortly after the break, Manager Lou Piniella announced plans to retire following the season. However, as the Cubs continued to play lackluster baseball it became apparent a change was needed sooner, and on August 22nd Piniella would step down to take care of family matters. In his final game the Cubs would be blasted by the Braves at Wrigley Field 16-5. For the remainder of the season, the Cubs would be led by Mike Quade. Under Quade the Cubs who had a 51-74 record with Piniella showed immediate improvement sweeping the Washington Nationals on the road, in the Interim Manager's first three games. With the September call ups playing solid baseball the Cubs would finish the season strong, posting a 24-13 record in their final 37 games under Quade. There would be no saving the season, as the Cubs finished in fifth place with a disappointing 75-87 record. The strong play down the stretch would be enough to allow Mike Quade to hand as Manager of the Cubs as he was given a two year deal following the season. The off-season would also bring sadness to Wrigleyville, as long time Cubs icon Ron Santo died at the age of 70 on December 3rd due to complications from bladder cancer and diabetes.

2011
:
As the season began for the Cubs, it was clear that these were gloomy days in Wrigleyville. Despite fans objections, General Manager Jim Hendry was still in charge and the Cubs Manager Mike Quade, who had the interim removed from his title, did not instill much excitement in the fan base. The Cubs, tried to improve their rotation by acquiring Matt Garza from the Tampa Bay Rays, while signing Free Agent 1B Carlos Pena. To help the bullpen the Cubs welcomed back Kerry Wood, who left following the 2008 season. On thing adding to the depression on the North Side of Chicago was the loss of Ron Santo who died during the off-season after a life long struggle with diabetes. Since retiring Santo had been a faithful cheerleader for the Cubs on WGN. The Cubs would struggle right from the start of the season, as they posted a 12-14 record in April, and barely even saw the .500 mark. Things would only get worse, in May, June and July as the Cubs were quickly out of the race. In August the Cubs, would post their only winning month, with a record of 16-13 as GM Jim Hendry was fired on August 21st. A week earlier Hendry and Quade had to deal with one last outburst from Carlos Zambrano who threatened to retire after allowing five home runs to the Atlanta Braves. The Cubs would suspend Zambrano the rest of the season. In the off-season he would finally be traded away as the Cubs received Chris Volstad from the Miami Marlins in return. The Cubs would go on to finish in fifth place with a terrible record of 71-91. Following the season the Cubs would reach a deal with the Boston Red Sox and name Theo Epstien as the club's new president of baseball operations. While in Boston, Epstein ended the Red Sox 86 year World Series drought using some of the same Moneyball tactics as Billy Beane in Oakland. The Cubs obviously hope he can do the same with their drought which is now 104 years and counting. In addition to Epstein, the Cubs added Jed Hoyer as General Manager, while Dale Sveum replaced Mike Quade as manager.

2012
:
As the Theo Epstein era began the Cubs gave their fans a reminder that Rome was not built in a day and that championship don't happen overnight. Epstein who was credited with ending the Boston Red Sox, winning two World Series in 2004 and 2007 took over as the Cubs President, hiring Jed Hoyer as the team's new General Manager and Dale Sveum as the Cubs new manager. Early on it was clear that Cubs had a long way to go before contending as they lost 11 of their first 14 games on the way to posting a record of 8-15 during April. Things did not get any better in May as they posted a record of 10-17, as Kerry Wood decided to call it a career on May 18th striking out Dayan Viciedo of the Chicago White Sox in his final appearance. The fans at Wrigley Field gave Wood a long standing ovation as his son, Justin, ran out to greet him as he exited the field for the final time. The Cubs again went 10-17 during June. In the two weeks leading up to the All-Star Break the Cubs played their best baseball of the season, winning 12 of 16 games as they posted a winning record of 15-10 in July. However, August and September just brought more losses as they lost 42 of their last 60 games to finish the season with a record of 61-101 marking the first 100 loss season for the Cubs since 1966 as they finished in fifth place. Even individually there were few bright spots as Alfonso Soriano led the team with 32 home runs and 108 RBI, as rookie Anthony Rizzo, who was named Rookie of the Month during July gave Cubs fans a player to watch for the future with 15 home runs and 85 RBI in just 87 games. The 23 year old Rizzo was also feel good story as he survived a bout of Hodgkin's lymphoma a form of cancer in 2008.  

2013: Coming of their first 100 loss season in 46 years, the Cubs looked to improve, while remaining patient with their plan to rebuild through the farm system. The Cubs started the season with a 3-1 over the Pittsburgh Pirates, as Jeff Samardzija earned the win. The Cubs would drop four of their first six games on the road, before coming home to face the Milwaukee Brewers in the home opener. Veteran Edwin Jackson who the Cubs signed to give them a reliable arm in the rotation struggled as the Cubs lost 7-3. It would be a regular occurrence for Jackson who posted a record of 8-18 with an ERA of 4.98. For much of the first two months the Cubs looked to be on track for another 100-loss season as they held a 18-30 record. However, they began to show some signs of improvement with five straight wins, as they won the first three games against the Chicago White Sox, and later completed the sweep, winning the rain date make up on July 8th. July would be the only month in which the Cubs posted a winning record of as they again were among the worst teams in baseball, posting a record of 66-96. Jeff Samardzija was the Cubs best pitcher, with a record of 8-13, with an ERA of 4.34 as he was one of the top strikeout pitchers in the National League with 214. However, the Cubs had a distinct lack of power Anthony Rizzo (23) and Nate Schierholtz (21) were the only Cubs to hit 20 homers, though Alfonso Soriano had 17 homers before being traded to the New York Yankees at the trade deadline. Rizzo (80) and Schierhlz (68) also led the Cubs in RBI as the team's.238 average was among the worst in all of baseball. Among the disappointments was Starlin Castro who hit just.245, with ten home runs and 44 RBI. Following the season the Cubs would dismiss Manager Dale Sveum after just two seasons.  
  
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